COMPANY PROFILE

MATHESON

Matheson logo


CONTACT INFO

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Address

1377 Cleveland Ave.
Santa Rosa
CA, 95407
United States
Phone
(800) 823-2837
Fax
(707) 575-3949
Primary
Chris Felciano

An Industry Leader for over 80 years

In 1926 MATHESON Gas Products became the first company to offer a reliable source of high quality scientific gases and equipment. From the start, MATHESON asserted its leadership by understanding specialty gas applications and providing products specially designed for these applications. Some of MATHESON's more notable accomplishments include the development of the lecture bottle, now used by virtually every major college and university in the world, and the supply of ultra pure gases that served as standards for the first gas chromatographs.

MATHESON's gases also helped forge the most important tool of our era, the integrated circuit. From the early days of the transistor, MATHESON was there providing the arsine and phosphine that made production possible. As transistors gave way to complex semiconductor chips, MATHESON provided the world's first commercially produced silane, an accomplishment that earned the industry's prestigious "SEMMY" Award.

In 1999 MATHESON Gas Products merged with Tri-Gas, Inc., to form Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc. This merger combined the analytical and semiconductor strengths of MATHESON Gas Products with the liquid/bulk and industrial cylinder and equipment capabilities of Tri-Gas. As a member of the Tokyo based Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation (TNSC), MATHESON® is part of the world's fifth largest supplier of gases and gas handling equipment.

MATHESON Snapshot

Our Products & Services



Gas. Equipment. Expertise.
Solutions for your requirements ... large and small.

 

industrial gas

 

 

 

 

Industrial Gas, Liquefied Gas, Propane and Equipment 

For Food; Construction; Cryogenics and more. In Cylinders; Dewars; Tonners; Tube trailers, Winery and Beer Making. More>>

electronics materials

 

 

 

 

Electronics Materials

Photovoltaics. Precursors. FAB Manufacturing. Nanotechnology.
More>>

specialty gas

 

 

 

 

Specialty Gases and Equipment 

Laboratory. R/D. Chemical. Environmental. Petrochemical. 
More>>

medical gas

 

 

 

 

Medical Gases 

Pure gases and gas mixtures for inhalation, sterilization, support for medical devices and procedures. More>>

bulk and on-site gas

 

 

 

 

Bulk Gas & On-Site Production 

Air separation. On-site supply & production. Services. Systems.  More>>

welding and cutting gas

 

 

 

 

Welding & Cutting Gases and Equipment

Welding and shield gas. Power sources. Electrodes. Welding and safety supplies. More>>

Our Company offers a wide range of products to meet our Customer's needs including:

· Full Service Laboratory and Specialty Gas supplier

· On-Site Laboratory Services

· Cryogenic Gases

· Medical grade gases & mixtures

· Welding Equipment & Supplies

· Winery Equipment & Supplies

· Stainless Steel Shapes, Fittings & Valves

· Safety Equipment

· Factory Authorized Warranty Repair & Service Center

In-Line Sparger - Adjust the Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide accurately and effectively. Multiple sizes anc connections available. Features clean out ports on both ends of stainless steel diffuser.
Cam and Grove Couplers - are the standard connection for hoses. Available in multiple sizes
Spray Balls - Durable stainless steel construction. Stationary and roating, easy mounting, 3/4" FPT and pinned connection. Rebuild kits available.
Economy Lug Style Butterfly Valve - High quality fusion bonded epoxy coasted with stainless stem and wafer. Lockable lever and 10 position notch plate, pins and springs.
Barrel Cleaning Wand - 2 styles available, stainless steel. Shown with rotating spray head and ball valve.
Standard Barrel Racking Arm - Stainless Steel, Various custom sizes available.
Stirring Wand Single Handle - 304 stainless steel, standard and custom sizes available.
Stirring Wand Double Handle - Curved to allow insertion between barrels stacked in racks. 304 stainless steel, standard and custom sizes available.
2" TriClamped Pump Over Device - Custom spool assembly available based on tank size. Efficient irrigation method.
Barrel Master Racking Device - all 304 polished stainless steel construction. Adjustable foot and bung for use with various sizes of barrels and kegs.
Keg Dip Tube Device - 2" and 4" clamped connection for use with kegs. 304 stainless steel, custom sizes available.
Tri-Action Tank Safety Vent - 2" clamped 304 stainless steel, can be used with positive pressure system.
Barrel Topping Gun - 304 polished stainless steel, 1/4" hose barb input, spring loaded handle. Rebuild kit available.
Carbon Dioxide Snow Horn - Stainless steel or plastic gas blanketing device, High pressure hose, connects directly to Carbon Dioxide cylinder with syphon tube.
Punch Down Device - 304 stainless steel construction, available in 46" or 66" lengths. Custom sizes and styles available
SO2 Dispensing System - Our system is designed for the easy addition of SO2 solution to tanks and barrels. Fast, reliable, no pump required. Economy or deluxe version available.
2 Bottle Purger/Sparger - Adjustable time setting and height. For use with Argon, Carbon Dioxide and Nitrogen ( Two bottle Nitrogen Sparger )
Pure SO2 Dispenser - Allows accurate measurement of pure liquid SO2 to wine. Rugged 316L stainless steel and thick glass dispensers have a fill valve, liquid valve and a gas vent valve. Available in two sizes. Replacement parts are also available.
A Frame Parts Board - Perforated stainless steel allows for various layout of parts. Comes with 80 stainless steel pegs. Lockable swivel stainless steel casters for easy moving. Open center allows for multiple storage
15 Gallon Keg Assembly for Topping Barrels - Compact design to fit between barrel racks. Shown wil all stainless steel cart, regulator, topping gun, keg tube device, hose, Nitrogen cylinder and 15 gallon keg.

News Archive


Winemaking Solutions Featured at Unified Wine & Grape Symposium
18 January, 2019

Matheson Tri-Gas will be featuring the H2SO3 6% Solution Digital Solution Dispenser.

This programmable digital dispenser will deliver a 6% Sulfurous Acid Solution (H2SO3) in milliliters. The dispenser can be used at the crusher during harvest or connected directly to the must pump. It is also used for barrels during the aging of wine. It also allows the operator to remotely start H2SO3 additions using a digital radio transmitter.

The batch controller automatically shuts off the H2SO3 flow when the desired quantity is measured by the flowmeter.

Features:

  • Remote controlled activation
  • Accurate, reliable, safe
  • Can be used to dispense any liquid solution, such as tartaric acid
  • Maintains a constant solution percentage and exact metered measurement
  • Closed dispensing system minimizes exposure to acid gas vapors
  • Wetted surfaces stainless steel construction
  • 110 A/C or rechargable batter

Come check it out at Booth 1602!


Specialty Products Designed for Winemaking
19 July, 2017

In order to serve the needs of the vineyard and winery more completely, MATHESON offers specialty products for wine production in addition to gases, liquid products, and gas handling equipment.

 

Specialty equipment and tools for Wine Production include:

  • Gas blanketing devices
  • Carbon dioxide snow horns
  • Pressure transfer devices
  • Dispensers for handling SO2 and H2SO3
  • Sanitary fittings, valves, and tools

 Specialty Equipment for Wine Making

 Other Products for Wine Making

For more information, click here


We're More Than Just Gas! We Have Hoses for Every Winery Need
25 March, 2016

This year, we’re sure you’ll be using many different hoses for many different applications. So, let us help you with your winery hose needs. Such as…

  • Winery Air Lines - You choose fittings; Quick Disconnect Fittings
  • Winery Water Hoses - You choose fittings; Quick Disconnect Fittings
  • Glycol Hose with 3/4" NPT Fittings - or - You choose fittings
  • SO2 Gas Transfer Hose
  • Lees Hose Lines
  • 6% SO3 Solution Transfer Hose
  • Wine Suction/Discharge Hose
  • High Pressure Wine & Brewery Hose

We also Specialize in:

  • Compressed & Liquid Gases
  • Safety & Lab Supplies
  • Regualtors, Gas Manifolds
  • Welding Supplies
  • Sulfur Dioxide Delivery
  • Toppign Keg systems
  • Stainless Steel Fittings
  • Stainless Steel Tubing
  •  Hose Repair

Call for your quote today and start to save your company time and money by working with Matheson!! We're more than just gas.


MATHESON is Awarded Food Safety System Certification 22000
11 August, 2014

Basking Ridge, NJ, USA – August 7, 2014 - MATHESON announces that four of its air separation units have received Food Safety System Certification (FSSC 22000):  San Antonio, TX; West Palm Beach, FL; Stafford, TX; and Dallas, TX. The MATHESON FSSC 22000 system currently applies to the manufacture and distribution of bulk liquid nitrogen.
FSSC 22000 is the world's leading, independently managed, nonprofit food certification scheme for ISO 22000-based certification of food safety management systems. FSSC 22000 is a recognized scheme of the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) for the safe manufacture, packaging, storage and distribution of foods and food packaging materials.
FSSC 22000 adheres to the requirements set forth in the ISO 22000 standard and the ISO TS22002-1 technical requirements. It is the combination of these two sets of requirements that meets the GFSI approved scheme for certification.
Whereas ISO 9001 pertains to the quality of the product and the FDA GMPs address the purity of the product, ISO 22000 looks to the food safety aspects of the product. It covers aspects such as building design, pest control, chemical storage, site access, employee hygiene, internal and external communications and product identification.
“In response to significant demand from our food manufacturing customers, MATHESON began the process of GFSI certification FSSC 22000 standards in late 2012.  We have already achieved certification for four of our ASU’s with the goal of certification for our entire fleet in the near future,” said Hermann Miskelly, Vice President of Quality for MATHESON.
MATHESON is a single source for industrial, welding and safety supplies, medical, specialty and electronic gases, gas handling equipment, high performance purification systems, engineering and gas management services, and on-site gas generation with a mission to deliver innovative solutions for global customer requirements. MATHESON is the largest subsidiary of the Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation Group, one of the five largest suppliers of industrial, specialty, and electronics gases in the world.
 

Matheson is now a stocking distributor of Nova Flex Hose
21 April, 2014

Connoisseurs Wine Hose. Special kink and crush resistant rubber hose, designed utilizing a multi-ply construction with dual special monofilament helix rods.  The tube is for non-oily application. Designed to meet the demands of “cleaning in process”. This ultra smooth microbe resistant tube is built on special stainless steel mandrels for cleanliness. Matheson is now a Nova Flex Hose Distributor. Email Tim Beaver at tbeaver@mathesongas.com for price and availability. 


Safety: Workplace Skin Protection
18 September, 2012

Skin diseases are the most common on-the-job illness. Irritant contact dermatitis remains the most common occupational skin disease. It is usually associated with toxic reactions to chemicals used in the workplace. Another area of concern to OSHA is dermal protection associated with sun exposure causing skin cancer.

One of the best ways to protect your 2,800 square inches of skin is to keep it covered up.

General Hazards:

♦ Dermatitis is the name for rashes, itching, swelling and other irritations that develop from exposure to substances.

♦ Sensitization is allergy-like reactions, including rashes, that may be experienced whenever in the vicinity of a chemical following frequent or long exposure.

♦ Skin can be burned by a flame, hot surface, electrical exposure or exposure to a corrosive substance.

♦ Cuts, bruises, and other wounds can let bacteria in to the skin and lead to infections.

Skin protection tips:

♦ Use the least hazardous substance that will do the job.

♦ Keep chemical containers closed when not in use.

♦ Follow MSDS handling instructions.

♦ Bandage any small scrapes or cuts before putting on gloves or protective clothing.

♦ Wash promptly and thoroughly after working with hazardous substances.

♦ Don’t clean hands with solvents or industrial detergents.

♦ Apply barrier skin creams and lotions to clean, non-irritated skin before starting job.

♦Washand dry skin thoroughly at the end of work.

♦ Wear sun block when working outside.

First Aid for Skin Problems:

♦ Chemical Exposure. Wash the exposed skin thoroughly with lots of soap and water for at least 15 minutes. If your clothing was exposed to the hazardous substance, try to remove it while wearing gloves.

♦ Minor Burn. Rinse in cold water and put on a sterile bandage.

♦ Skin cut. Wash with soap and water and cover with a sterile bandage.


Importance of Safety Training
18 July, 2012

Routine work can dull alertness and a relaxed attitude can replace the caution that existed when the job was new and interesting. In many jobs the same route is traveled daily over the same roads or the same tasks are repeated with little conscious thought. Without some periodic reawakening to the ever-present hazards, lethargy deepens and the odds of an accident occurring can increase.

Workers may not always recognize the importance of safety training or think of it as unnecessary because they’ve "been doing it for years." But an important benefit of periodic safety training is the reminder that a danger can exist and the no one is immune to accidents. Therefore, it is important for workers to understand the purpose of the training session, why it will be useful to them, and what can result from not following safety rules and procedures.

 The safety training should be organized so that the order in which the material is presented will match the steps that should be taken on the job. Make sure every worker understands the training material; not just that they were present or a test was given. Insist on questions from trainees after a session to tell you what did or didn't sink in. This will let you know what has to be reviewed again. If there's a general lack of understanding of hazards or safety rules and practices, schedule another safety meeting or plan a refresher course for a later date.

 Employees should be able to immediately practice and apply new knowledge and skills. If workers don't understand safety training information well enough to use it on the job, the training has not been effective. There should be immediate feedback if workers are doing their job safely or not. Supervisors should watch employees do their jobs and question them, to identify what they do, or don't, know.

 Most of these tips are relatively simple and inexpensive solutions, but the safety payoff can be enormous. Remember, training is only effective when workers understand, and use, what they've learned. It takes less than a second to lose the rest of your life.


Safety: Protecting Workers from Heat Stress Heat Illness
27 June, 2012

Protecting Workers from Heat Stress Heat Illness

Exposure to heat can cause illness and death. The most serious heat illness is heat stroke. Other heat illnesses, such as heat exhaustion, heat cramps and heat rash, should also be avoided.

There are precautions your employer should take any time temperatures are high and the job involves physical work.

Risk Factors for Heat Illness

• High temperature and humidity, direct sun exposure, no breeze or wind

• Low liquid intake

• Heavy physical labor

• Waterproof clothing

• No recent exposure to hot workplaces

Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion

• Headache, dizziness, or fainting

• Weakness and wet skin

• Irritability or confusion

• Thirst, nausea, or vomiting

Symptoms of Heat Stroke

• May be confused, unable to think clearly, pass out, collapse, or have seizures (fits)

• May stop sweating

To Prevent Heat Illness, Your Employer Should

• Provide training about the hazards leading to heat stress and how to prevent them.

• Provide a lot of cool water to workers close to the work area. At least one pint of water per hour is needed.

• Schedule frequent rest periods with water breaks in shaded or air conditioned areas.

• Routinely check workers who are at risk of heat stress due to protective clothing and high temperature.

• Consider protective clothing that provides cooling.

How You Can Protect Yourself and Others

• Know signs/symptoms of heat illnesses; monitor yourself; use a buddy system.

• Block out direct sun and other heat sources.

• Drink plenty of fluids. Drink often and BEFORE you are thirsty. Drink water every 15 minutes.

• Avoid beverages containing alcohol or caffeine.

• Wear lightweight, light colored, loose fitting clothes.

What to Do When a Worker is Ill from the Heat

• Call a supervisor for help. If the supervisor is not available, call 911.

• Have someone stay with the worker until help arrives.

• Move the worker to a cooler/shaded area.

• Remove outer clothing.

• Fan and mist the worker with water; apply ice (ice bags or ice towels).

• Provide cool drinking water, if able to drink.

IF THE WORKER IS NOT ALERT or seems confused, this may be a heat stroke. CALL 911 IMMEDIATELY and apply ice as soon as possible.

If you have any questions or concerns, call OSHA at 1-800-321-OSHA (6742).


MATHESON Opens New Welding Depot in Ft. Myers, Florida
21 June, 2012


MATHESON announces the grand opening of a new Gas and Welding Supply Store and Depot in Ft. Myers, FL.  This location is part of MATHESON’s Southeast Zone with 14 local sites throughout Florida.  It is strategically positioned in the Industrial market in a high traffic area with easy access to commercial and residential customers.  All MATHESON industrial gases, welding supplies, propane, safety equipment, and tools will be available for sale from this new facility.

 "This self-service showroom will provide new and existing customers a great buying experience.  This facility will allow us to show our innovative line of gasses and consumables for the metal fabrication industry. We will also showcase our vast safety offering as well as our complete line of medical products,” said Ian Freedman, Southeast Zone Vice President, MATHESON.

 MATHESON is a single source for industrial, medical, specialty and electronic gases, gas handling equipment, high performance purification systems, engineering and gas management services, and on-site gas generation with a mission to deliver innovative solutions for global customer requirements. MATHESON is the largest subsidiary of the Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation Group, the largest Japanese supplier of industrial gases and one of the five largest suppliers of industrial, specialty, and electronics gases in the world.


MATHESON Opens New Retail Facility in Tornado-Stricken Joplin Missouri
11 June, 2012

 

Basking Ridge, NJ – June 6, 2012 - MATHESON officially opened its new facility inJoplinMissouri on June 6. The new building replaces the structure lost in a devastating tornado last year.

MATHESON has supplied compressed gases, welding equipment, and related items from its facility onSouth Davis BoulevardinJoplinsince 2002. On Sunday, May 22, 2011, a tornado estimated to be 1.5 miles wide cut a swath through that part of the city. The store was “A total loss, except for our liquid vessels,” according to Jeff Lackore, MATHESON Area Retail Manager. The site includes liquid storage for oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and argon.

Remarkably, apart from the Monday after the storm when most of Joplin was closed under a state of emergency, MATHESON never needed to close the Joplin business, not even temporarily. MATHESON’s other locations in the region supplied product to customers and lent delivery trucks to theJoplin operation.  The debris was cleaned up, and a fence was erected to secure the site. Local operations were restored quickly; initially from the remaining concrete slab, and later from inside a 98 foot tent.

MATHESON, just like many business operations in Joplin, quickly committed to an ambitious rebuilding plan. The new Joplin store opened just two weeks after the one year anniversary of the deadly tornado.  MATHESON’s South Central Zone Vice President, Daniel Lambert, cut the ribbon to officially open the new store and commented,  “The fact that we have a brand new structure up and operating in a year’s time is a tribute not only to the MATHESON team in the region, but to all the hard-working people of Joplin. The recovery of this city is amazing.”

The new store includes a state-of-the-art retail front end, with 1,400 square feet of sales display and demo space. “That is almost double what we had before, with a better layout,” says Lackore. “It’s been a pleasure to set up, and we expect that customers will find the new front end easy to navigate, with shelf stock easy to find.”

The new front end features a customer convenience center, with vending and some complimentary refreshments. Product displays are colorful and well-lit, with separate spaces set aside for key equipment suppliers. “It’s not a typical welding supply store,” said Bob Klopnieski, MATHESON Region General Manager.

The new building includes a conference room that MATHESON plans to use for internal meetings, customer meetings, and as a training room.

The Company also took the opportunity to modernize and expand the gas cylinder depot and product inventory stockroom. “The work areas are more spacious and generally a better environment for productivity and safety,” says Klopnieski. The filling and cylinder depot areas are scalable, to accommodate future expansion.

Loading docks are covered to allow for weather-protected loading and unloading. The customer loading dock features a hydraulic lift to accommodate virtually any vehicle size and loading height.

Inside the building, a storm shelter will protect employees, customers, and other visitors in the event of a future tornado.

Jeff Lackore noted, “Fortunately, no one from MATHESON was injured in the May 2011 tornado, and as Joplin is a home town community, everyone here knows somebody whose life changed that day. Today, we are celebrating the opening of a new store. However, we’ll never forget those for whom this time of year will forever have tragic memories.”

Click on link for before and after photos of the Joplin Missouri Location:

http://www.mathesongas.com/marketing/campaigns/jun12/MATHESON_joplinstore.html


Have you taken advantage of our TGIF Promotion?
08 June, 2012

Come check out The grinder is free promotion through July 15, 2012.

Purchase one of our Sait or Norton Grinding/Cutting packages and receive a free grinder.

Check out our flyer under the resources tab.

To find the store nearest you, visit: http://www.mathesongas.com/contactus.aspx.

Stop by our nearest store and see our great selection of Brand Name Tools, Welding Supplies, Safety Equipment and Industrial Gases.

National reach. Local values.


Open House - May 16, 2012 - St. Helena
14 May, 2012

Open House – May 16, 2012 from 10am to 3pm

Have you heard, there’s a new store in St. Helena that is equipped to service 10 facets of your wine production operation?

Matheson has built a state of the art store in the middle of wine country and we are here to SERVE YOU!!

Come down for a meet and greet, eat some yummy food, including Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream!! (It’s the best!!!!!) We will be demonstrating some various winery maintenance operations, displaying a Nitrogen Micro-bulk tank for bottling operations, and sharing our knowledge and expertise with you. They’ll be music, food and fun for all!!

Visit our St Helena site at 990 Vintage Ave Suite A, St. Helena, CA 94574


TGIF Promotion is back!
23 April, 2012

Our the grinder is free promotion is back. Now through July 15, 2012, purchase one of our Sait or Norton Grinding/Cutting packages and receive a free grinder.

Check out our flyer under the resources tab.

To find the store nearest you, visit: http://www.mathesongas.com/contactus.aspx.

Stop by our nearest store and see our great selection of Brand Name Tools, Welding Supplies, Safety Equipment and Industrial Gases.

National reach. Local values.


House Keeping
12 April, 2012

 

Most of you probably have house cleaning responsibilities at home. For some of you, it's a regular weekly chore.

Whatever the case may be, you'll agree that good housekeeping practices are important at home.

However, what we sometimes overlook is that good housekeeping is a key duty on the job, too. The orderly arrangement of work areas is vital to the safety of all workers, regardless of whether they are involved with machines and tools or with appliances and furniture.

It's a fact that approximately 6,000 persons are killed on the job annually in theUnited States, and an estimated 19,500 in home accidents.

Seventeen percent of the on-the-job deaths are caused by falls, many of which result from just plain poor housekeeping practices.

Falls often result from tripping over loose articles such as tools left in aisleways and work areas. Wet spots on the floor, or trash and other articles left in stairways also take their toll.

During periods of rain and snow, you know what happens when you and the kids track water into the house from outside. Tracked-in water is a serious problem at work, too. Wet spots cause slips and falls. They should be cleaned up immediately, regardless of who was responsible for their being there.

We have trash receptacles placed in several strategic areas, so there is no excuse for waste paper, pop bottles, or other materials being thrown on the floor.

You'd better get in close for a sure shot at the trash barrel.

A word of caution. If a bottle should be broken on the floor, don't attempt to pick up the glass with your bare hands,

Wear gloves or sweep up the pieces. The same procedure should be used for cleaning up nails and other sharp objects.

Let's face it. It is just a lot easier to do your job when your work area is kept neat. Keep your tools and equipment off the floor and stored in the proper places. This not only reduces tripping hazards, but protects the equipment you use to earn a living with.

Did you ever go to your closet at home to get your golf clubs and have to pull them out from under some other articles? Things start falling all over. It's a mess. But before you blow your cool, stop and think. "How many times have I left stuff piled on top of the golf clubs when I was in a hurry looking for something else in the closet?"

The same principles apply when storing materials or equipment on the job. Take time to make the piles neat. It's

unsafe to stack them too high and, if possible, it's best to keep them away from other equipment or articles that are used often.

We have to be a lot like a quarterback, keeping our eyes open for changes in the defense or certain other telltale moves of opposing players. On the job, we should keep a lookout for danger signals—loose flooring, articles out of place, or other unsafe conditions. These things should be corrected immediately, or notify me and I'll see that they're taken care of.

In closing, I'd like to emphasize that we're all dependent on each other for safety. It's up to each of us


Employee Safety Responsibilities
15 March, 2012

Californiaemployers are responsible for maintaining a safe work place and adopting an Injury and

Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) to protect workers from job hazards. But employers are not the only ones responsible for safety on the job –Californiaworkers have responsibilities for maintaining a safe workplace as well. Do you know your safety responsibilities?

Know and follow all of your employer’s health and safety rules such as safe work practices and standard operating procedures. Be familiar with the Cal OSHA safety requirements that regulate your industry. These regulations and guidelines are designed to educate and protect you from hazards and injuries on the job. Know the emergency and evacuation procedures and the location of emergency equipment on your jobsite; clear thinking and immediate action in an emergency can save lives.

Attend all of the safety training that your employer offers. Training helps you identify job hazards and take the appropriate precautions to protect yourself and co-workers. Never operate equipment unless you have been properly trained. Read and understand the material safety data sheet (MSDS) and know the hazards and safe work practices for all of the chemicals that you work with. If you have a question about equipment, a chemical, or a process, ask your supervisor – taking a chance at work can mean taking a chance with your life.

You are responsible for the safety of your own actions while on the job. Conduct yourself professionally and with your mind on your own safety and the safety of others at all times; the workplace is no place for horseplay or lack of attention. Serve as a good role model to co-workers for safe work practices and behavior. Maintain your personal work area and common areas in a clean and orderly manner; good housekeeping means a safer workplace. Always wear the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) required for your job tasks.

Talk with your supervisor about safety. If you have a suggestion to make a process or equipment safer, speak up! No one knows your job and tools better than you. Immediately warn co-workers and notify your supervisor of any malfunctioning equipment, hazardous conditions, and unsafe behavior in the workplace – someone’s life may depend on it. All accidents and near-misses should also be reported to your supervisor because investigating these incidents can lead to a safer environment. If you have a job-related injury or illness, promptly report it to your employer and seek appropriate treatment.

When you share the responsibility for safety in the workplace, everyone wins.


Common Sense Safety
27 February, 2012

There are a number of safety problems common to most workplace and job sites that can be solved with a little common sense. Planning ahead can eliminate most of these hazards.

  • Eliminate junk piles. Organize a clean up program to remove trash, broken parts, and scrap from work areas, walkways, storerooms, and neglected corners. Look for materials that have been stacked improperly.
  • Examine all the operations of your workplace to determine if personal protective clothing is needed, then make it readily available.
  • Make sure all electric power tools are grounded. Protect yourself from electric shock by using tools with three-prong plugs, a ground-fault system or double insulation. Tools and equipment should never be operated with the guards or shields removed.
  • Inspect portable ladders to make that they are secure and don’t shake or wiggle. If a ladder seems weak, get rid of it – don’t let others use a defective ladder. Marked it defective and throw it away.
  • Fire extinguishers are a must and should be mounted properly, readily accessible, and in working order. When was the last time your fire extinguishers were tested?
  • Exits should be clearly marked with easy to read signs place above the doors. Signs with arrows should also be used to guide people to the exit if the layout of the workplace is confusing to those unfamiliar with your facility.

Final note: Safety meeting are one of the most important parts of a good safety program, so hold them regularly. Impress upon every worker that it’s important that they take every precaution to keep the workplace safe. Both employee and employer attitudes toward safety provide a key to a successful safety program.


How to Get Employees Involved in Safety
07 February, 2012

Matheson prides itself in emphasizing the importance of safety and wanted to share these tips with you:

Even the Occupational Safety and Health Administration encourages companies to include their employees in the safety process. Not only does this keep workers informed about the details of your safety program, but it also gives them an opportunity to provide their input.

 However, including your employees is more than a matter of putting up a suggestion box in the break room or asking them what kind of safety glasses they prefer. At the same time, including your employees does not have to be a major ordeal. It can be as simple as changing safety lectures into roundtable discussions.

 In many workplaces, safety edicts come down from upper management and they become the rules your employees are expected to live by. A more effective approach would be to allow employees to set safety goals. In fact, instead of setting up management-only safety meetings, why not set up employee-only safety committees?

 Another way to get your employees enthused about safety is to provide incentives. Instead of trying to guess what kind of incentives might work, allow employees to select the types of incentives they feel would be the most appreciated and effective.

 Safety incentives are just one form of positive reinforcement. On a day-to-day basis, be sure you recognize employees who are performing safely. While you can’t ignore safety lapses, try to have more positive things to say than negative. This helps your employees look at safety as something positive, which serves as a good motivator and encourages them to take an active role in your safety efforts.


Safety Tip: Seven Common Accident Causes
18 January, 2012

Consider this statistic: 80 out of every 100 accidents are the fault of the person involved in the incident. Unsafe Actscause four timesas many accidents & injuries as unsafe conditions

Accidents occur for many reasons. In most industries people tend to look for "things" to blame when an accident happens, because it's easier than looking for "root causes," such as those listed below. Consider the underlying accident causes described. Have you been guilty of any of these attitudes or behaviors? If so, you may have not been injured-but next time you may not be so lucky.

Taking Shortcuts: Every day we make decisions we hope will make the job faster and more efficient. But do time savers ever risk your own safety, or that of other crew members? Short cuts that reduce your safety on the job are not shortcuts, but an increased chance for injury.

Being Over Confident: Confidence is a good thing. Overconfidence is too muchof a good thing. "It'll never happen to me" is an attitude that can lead to improper procedures, tools, or methods in your work.

Any of these can lead to an injury.

Starting a Task with Incomplete Instructions: To do the job safely and right the first time you need complete information. Have you ever seen a worker sent to do a job, having been given only a part of the job's instructions? Don't be shy about asking for explanations about work procedures and safety precautions. It isn't dumb to ask questions; it's dumb not to.

Poor Housekeeping: When clients, managers or safety professionals walk through your work site, housekeeping is an accurate indicator of everyone's attitude about quality, production and safety. Poor housekeeping creates hazards of all types. A well maintained area sets a standard for others to follow. Good housekeeping involves both pride and safety.

Ignoring Safety Procedures: Purposely failing to observe safety procedures can endanger you and your co-workers. You are being paid to follow the company safety policies-not to make your own rules. Being "casual" about safety can lead to a casualty!

Mental Distractions from Work: Having a bad day at home and worrying about it at work is a hazardous combination. Dropping your 'mental' guard can pull your focus away from safe work procedures. You can also be distracted when you're busy working and a friend comes by to talk while you are trying to work. Don't become a statistic because you took your eyes off the machine "just for a minute."

Failure to Pre-Plan the Work: There is a lot of talk today about Job Hazard Analysis. JHA's are an effective way to figure out the smartest ways to work safely and effectively. Being hasty in starting a task or not thinking through the process can put you in harms way. Instead,

Plan Your Work and then Work Your Plan!


Tis the Season for Winery Hoses
15 December, 2011

Greetings and Happy Holidays to you from your friends at Matheson. 

We’re offering information about Matheson’s capabilities for helping with your winery hose needs. As the new year begins, we’re sure you’ll be using many different hoses for many different applications. Such as…

Hoses for Every Winery Need:

  • Winery Air Lines - You choose fittings; Quick Disconnect Fittings
  • Winery Water Hoses - You choose fittings; Quick Disconnect Fittings
  • Glycol Hose with 3/4" NPT Fittings - or - You choose fittings
  • SO2 Gas Transfer Hose
  • Lees Hose Lines
  • 6% SO3 Solution Transfer Hose
  • Wine Suction/Discharge Hose
  • High Pressure Wine & Brewery Hose

We also Specialize in:

  • Compressed & Liquid Gases
  • Safety & Lab Supplies
  • Regualtors, Gas Manifolds
  • Welding Supplies
  • Sulfur Dioxide Delivery
  • Toppign Keg systems
  • Stainless Steel Fittings
  • Stainless Steel Tubing
  •  Hose Repair

Call for your quote today and start to save your company time and money by working with Matheson!!

 


New DOT Cell phone rule
06 December, 2011

Last week Wednesday, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announced a final rule specifically prohibiting interstate truck and bus drivers from using hand-held cell phones while operating their vehicles.

Drivers who violate the restriction will face federal civil penalties of up to $2,750 for each offense and disqualification from operating a commercial motor vehicle for multiple offenses.

Additionally, states will suspend a driver's commercial driver's license (CDL) after two or more serious traffic violations. Commercial truck and bus companies that allow their drivers to use hand-held cell phones while driving will face a maximum penalty of $11,000.


Thanksgiving Fire Prevention Safety
21 November, 2011

Thanksgiving Day has more than double the number of home cooking fires than an average day according to the U.S. Fire Administration. In fact, each year more than 4,000 fires occur on Thanksgiving Day. "Unattended cooking is the leading cause of Thanksgiving Day home fires, and it's easy to understand why," said Red Cross preparedness expert Heidi Taylor. "People can easily become distracted and lose track of what's happening in the kitchen when they are enjoying spending time with family and friends."

To help prevent home fires this Thanksgiving, the Red Cross suggests the following tips:

  • Keep potholders and food wrappers at least three feet away from heat sources while cooking
  • Wear tighter fitting clothing with shorter sleeves when cooking
  • Make sure all stoves, ovens, and ranges have been turned off when you leave the kitchen
  • Set timers to keep track of turkeys and other food items that require extended cooking times
  • Turn handles of pots and pans on the stove inward to avoid accidents
  • After guests leave, designate a responsible adult to walk around the home making sure that all candles and smoking materials are extinguished

Even with the best preparation and precautions, accidents can happen. Thanksgiving is high time for cooking related burns. Minor burns can be treated easily if you remember to save the butter for the rolls and not a burn. For a superficial burn, cool the area by running it under cold water until the heat eases and then loosely cover the burn with a sterile dressing.

Courtesy American Red Cross


Safety Tip: Prevent Injuries from Falling Objects
11 November, 2011

 Matheson prides itself in emphasizing the importance of safety and wanted to share these tips with you:

Objects falling from above and striking people below have caused serious industrial injuries and account for a number of fatalities every year. Although the exact number of “falling object” injuries is difficult to determine, documents produced in several recent court cases suggest that the practice of “high stacking” materials and supplies poses a serious safety threat to those below.

 Provide Adequate Warning - Workers or customers below depend on those working above for their safety. If you’re going to be doing work overhead, warn those in the area either verbally or with signs, ropes or barricades. For those below, it’s their responsibility to be aware of the work being done overhead and observe the warnings and barricades.

 Secure The Load - If you’ll be lifting a load to a higher level, make sure the load is balanced and secured so it won’t slip off. Restraints such as nylon strapping bands can be used to secure overhead goods. In some cases, merchandise to be stacked on top of racks can be shrink-wrapped in plastic to provide stability and keep loose boxes and other items from falling. If using plastic wrap remember that the plastic may stretch due to the high heat at the top of the racks and may cause the load to shift. Another safety precaution is to provide netting on stored items or restraining barsto keep the load in place. If you’re placing a load on a scaffold or platform, make sure there are guard rails or toe boards to prevent material from fall off.

 Moving A Load - Never lift, lower or swing a load over anyone’s head! Block off areas where loads are being lifted or lowered. Have a “spotter” in the adjoining aisle where items might be pushed off racks or platforms during moving or stacking of materials. If possible, restrict these stacking and heavy moving operations to hours when fewer people are present.

 Practice Good Housekeeping - Keep tools and other materials away from edges and off of railings or sills. Stack them on a flat surface; crosstie or cover them, if necessary, to keep them in place. If you’re working overhead, watch that you don’t kick, throw or sweep material off that could fall on anyone below.

 Whenever there’s a risk of falling objects at a worksite, an employer is required to provide protection for workers and visitors to the site. Hard hats and safety shoes are examples of personal protection against falling objects.


Be Safe during this Crush Season
17 October, 2011

 Matheson prides itself in emphasizing the importance of safety and wanted to share these tips with you:

Consider this statistic: 80 out of every 100 accidents are the fault of the person involved in the incident. Unsafe Acts cause four times as many accidents & injuries as unsafe conditions.

 Accidents occur for many reasons. In most industries people tend to look for “things” to blame when an accident happens, because it’s easier than looking for “root causes”, such as those listed below. Consider the underlying accident causes described. Have you been guilty of any of these attitudes or behaviors? If so, you may have not been injured but next time you may not be so lucky.

  • Taking Shortcuts: Every day we make decision we hope will make the job faster and more efficient. But do time savers ever risk your own safety, or that of other crew members? Short cuts that reduce your safety on the job are not shortcuts, but an increased chance for injury.
  • Being over Confident: Confidence is a good thing. Overconfidence is too much of a good thing. “It’ll never happen to me: is an attitude that can lead to improper procedures, tools or methods in your work. Any of these can lead to an injury.
  • Starting a Task with Incomplete Instructions: To do the job safely and right the first time you need complete information. Have you ever seen a worker sent to do a job, having been given only a part of the job’s instructions? Don’t be shy about asking for explanations about work procedures and safety precautions. It isn’t dumb to ask questions; it’s dumb not to.
  • Poor Housekeeping: When clients, managers or safety professionals walk through your work site, housekeeping is an accurate indicator of everyone’s attitude about quality, production and safety. Poor housekeeping creates hazards of all types. A well maintained area sets a standard for others to follow. Good housekeeping involves both pride and safety.
  • Ignoring Safety Procedures: Purposely failing to observe safety procedures can endanger you and your co-workers. You are being paid to follow the company safety policies-not make your own rules. Being “casual” about safety can lead to a casualty!
  • Mental Distractions from Work: Having a bad day at home and worrying about it at work is a hazardous combination. Dropping your ‘mental’ guard can pull your focus away from safe work procedures. You can also be distracted when you’re busy working and a friend comes by to talk while you are trying to work. Don’t become a statistic because you took your eyes off he machine for “just a minute”
  • Failure to Pre-Plan the Work: There is a lot of talk today about Job Hazard Analysis. JHA’s are an effective way to figure out the smartest ways to work safely and effectively. Being hasty in starting a task or not thinking through the process can put you in harms way. Instead, Plan Your Work and then Work Your Plan!

Matheson adds its winery product line to mathesondirect.com
12 October, 2011

Matheson now offers the ability to purchase custom made winery products online through our secure website at www.mathesondirect.com. Our website also offers specialty gas equipment, welding equipment, industrial gas equipment, and construction and power tools.

 Just enter "wine" in the search field to find our winey products. We are continuously uploading new items.

 Don’t see what you need? Contact our knowledgeable staff at (800) 823-2837.


Matheson's St. Helena site featured in Napa Valley Register
30 September, 2011

Congratulations to our St. Helena team for being featured in the Napa Valley Register.  Victor Guido was promoted from inside sales at our Cleveland Ave site, in Santa Rosa, to site manager for our St. Helena site. We would also like to extend a warm welcome to Gary Warburton as our new account representative.

Link to the article:

http://napavalleyregister.com/business/these-guys-get-your-gas-but-not-at-the-pump/article_4b238830-e71e-11e0-9f1d-001cc4c002e0.html


Matheson Opens New Winery, Welding and Gas center in St. Helena, CA
09 September, 2011

Matheson announces the grand opening of Winery, Welding and Gas center in St. Helena, CA. This location is part of Matheson's Western Zone, Central Region with 12 sites throughout Northern and Central California. It is strategically positioned in the Napa Valley Wine Country, located at: 990 Vintage Ave.Ste A, St. Helena, CA 94574. All Matheson industrial gases, welding supplies, winery supplies, stainless steel products, propane, safety equipment and tools will be available for sale from this new site.

Matheson is a single source for industrial, welding, safety supplies, winery supplies, stainless steel products, medical, specialty and electronic gases, gas handling equipment, engineering and gas management services, and on-site gas generation with a mission to deliver innovative solutions for global customer reqeuirements. Matheson is the largest subsidiary of Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation Group, one of the five largest suppliers of industrial, specialty, and electronics gases in the world.


SkillsUSA Competition Supported by MATHESON
26 August, 2011

MATHESON recently participated in the annual SkillsUSA Championship Competition held in Kansas City, Missouri. This year over 5,700 students participated in 94 contest events. Over 240 of these contestants competed in the welding categories. 

MATHESON has a 17-year history of contributing manpower and products to SkillsUSA, and is the main sponsor of the welding competitions at the annual championships. 

SkillsUSA is a national nonprofit organization serving teachers and high school and college students who are preparing for careers in trade, technical and skilled service occupations. 

The annual SkillsUSA Championships Event is the culmination of competitions held at local and state levels. In addition to the 5,700 students, nearly 1,500 judges and contest organizers from labor and management make the national event possible. 

This year, MATHESON donated over 400 hours of labor (including some site prep time on Father’s Day!) and over $10,000 in expenses. In addition, MATHESON provided over 250 gas cylinders for use in the competitions. 

Bob Klopnieski, Region Manager for MATHESON, said, “MATHESON is committed to supporting education in the trades and programs that keep our manufacturing base strong. Here at SkillsUSA, we enjoy having a big presence in the welding competitions, helping to ensure our future welders have the best equipment and supplies. At MATHESON, we talk about our commitment to the community and Local Values – it is events like this one that give us an opportunity to walk the walk and demonstrate our support. It’s fun, and it’s important – to these young adults, the manufacturing industry and to the country.” 

The winners of the various welding skills competitions – 10 in all – were awarded MATHESON Select® Limited Edition welding helmets donated by MATHESON. The other participants in the welding skills competitions received coupons for discounts on future MATHESON Select® helmet purchases. 

About SkillsUSA

SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry working together to ensure America has a skilled workforce. SkillsUSA helps each student excel. SkillsUSA's mission is to help its members become world-class workers, leaders and responsible American citizens.

SkillsUSA serves more than 300,000 students and instructors annually. The organization has 13,000 school chapters in 54 state and territorial associations. More than 14,500 instructors and administrators are professional members of SkillsUSA.


MATHESON is a single source for industrial, medical, specialty and electronic gases, gas handling equipment, high performance purification systems, engineering and gas management services, and on-site gas generation with a mission to deliver innovative solutions for global customer requirements. MATHESON is the largest subsidiary of the Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation Group, the largest Japanese supplier of industrial gases and one of the five largest suppliers of industrial, specialty, and electronics gases in the world. 

CONTACTS:
Beth Sullivan Christine K. Scully
Corporate Marcomm Manager Marketing Communication Manager
Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc. Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc.
bsullivan@matheson-trigas.com christine.scully@verizon.net
(215) 648-4026 (201) 825-1331

Save the Date - January 26 and 27 2011
29 December, 2010

Matheson will be in booth 1030 at the wine show in Sacramento, CA .

Please drop by and say hello.

We will be exhibiting some new products and be featuring many winery parts for all your winery needs.


DONT GET CRUSHED! Be prepared with specialty products from Matheson
19 October, 2010

DONT GET CRUSHED! Be prepared with specialty products from Matheson

The crush is coming, so plan for those specialty products now and we'll deliver them just in-time, worry and hassle free. Consider the following in your resource planning:

Carbon Dioxide for Refrigeration and Purging

  • Solid -Dry ice and rice ice pellets
    • Maintain proper wine must temperatures (cold soaking)
    • Purge tanks quickly and conveniently
  • Liquid Cylinders -
    • With Snow Horn to cool harvested grapes in the vineyard
    • Purge tanks and wine tanker trucks.
  • High Pressure Cylinderswith siphon tubes -
    • With Snow Horn to purge tanks and wine tanker trucks
    • Where portability is important
    • Ease of measurability

SO2

  • Pure SO2 in liquid withdrawal cylinders
  • Dispensers for pure SO2
    • Pure, safe, convenient and accurate
    • available in 1000g in 10g increments or 5000g in 50g increments

SO3

  • 6% SO3 solution is safe and easy to use.
  • Available in 5 gallon and 42 gallon containers.

Propane

  • 8 gallon standard forklift cylinders
  • Have extra inventory of secure, safe, full and properly maintained cylinders.
  • Convenient delivery with your other gases.

Safety catalog available on-line: http://www.mathesongas.com/

So get a jump on the crush! Call today to place your order and we will insure that you have the products you need when you need them.

 

Adobe Acrobat File

Order form for Winery Items


Adobe Acrobat File

Order form for Winery Items


Adobe Acrobat File

Order form for Winery Items


Adobe Acrobat File

Order form for Winery Items.


Adobe Acrobat File

Order form for Winery Items


Adobe Acrobat File

Order form for Winery Items


Adobe Acrobat File

Order form for Winery items


Adobe Acrobat File

Order form for Winery items


Here is a list of our locations servicing California and Nevada, for service outside these states please call 800-823-2837 for further assistance.

Paso Robles
1180 Vendels Circle Paso Robles CA 939001
Phone: 831-769-0484, Fax: 831-769-9081

Petaluma
2100 Petaluma Blvd Petaluma CA 94952
Phone: 707-778-6264, Fax: 707-778-6265

Redwood City
947 Broadway Redwood City CA 94063
Phone: 650-368-2821, Fax: 650-369-0394

Salinas
9154 Harkins Rd Salinas CA 93901
Phone: 831-769-0484, Fax: 831-769-9081

San Jose
140 S Montgomery St San Jose CA 95110
Phone: 408-287-2893, Fax: 408-287-8638

Santa Cruz
324 River Rd Santa Cruz CA 95060
Phone: 831-423-0808, Fax: 831-423-0851

Santa Maria
423 W Betteravia Santa Maria CA 93455
Phone: 805-349-8869, Fax: 805-239-8298

Santa Rosa
1377 Cleveland Ave Santa Rosa CA 95401
Phone: 707-546-6214, Fax: 707-546-4103

Santa Rosa
3220 Santa Rosa Ave Santa Rosa CA 95407
Phone: 707-575-8654, Fax: 707-575-3694

St. Helena
990 Vintage Ave, St. Helena, CA 4574
Phone:  707-963-4307, Fax: 707-963-6038

Ukiah
3080 N. State St Ukiah CA 95482
Phone: 707-462-6651, Fax: 707-482-9037

Sacramento
717 Houston St West Sacramento CA 95691
Phone: 916-372-4272, Fax: 916-372-5280

Nevada
825 Marietta Way Sparks NV 89431
Phone: 775-359-5211, Fax: 775-219-7972