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THE GOODE COMPANY

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Address

655 Park Ct.
Rohnert Park
CA, 94928
United States
Phone
(707) 588-8028
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The Goode Co

 

The Goode Company is an uncommon marketing solutions provider. Guided by a customer-focused philosophy, we’re a far cry from your everyday print service provider.

Through continuous process improvement, investing in technology, and creative problem solving, we build lasting business partnerships with customers. It’s our trademark.

Ours is an interesting history.
Originally, there were two separate companies. In 2010, GPM (Goode Printing and Mailing) merged with Impress Northwestern, and the Goode Company was born. Both had been successful Sonoma County businesses for 40+ years. Our new organization is stronger than either company could have been on its own.

The Goode Company is one of largest printing companies in Northern California, occupying a 77,000-square-foot facility in Rohnert Park. We offer a wide array of print communication services as well as targeted direct marketing, web-based print on demand, and much more.

The "Goode" way

We all take extreme pride in our work. Focusing on customers’ goals fuels our passion for great quality and service.
Why choose the Goode Company? Well, we asked our customers. Here’s what they told us:

It’s about the way we do business.

• The way we treat our customers
• The way we treat our employees
• The way we manage our business
• The way we take pride in our work
• The way we care about what we produce
• The way we continuously improve ourselves
• The way we create solutions to customer challenges
• The way we make it easy for our customers to work with us

Honesty and integrity, trust and commitment. They’re not just buzz words. It’s doing business the “Goode” way.

 

 

What differentiates us from our competition is how we Partner with our clients in helping them achieve their sales goals.
When you succeed, we want to be an integral part of that success. We do so by our customer focused, consultative approach and applying our experience and expertise to transform your marketing vision into reality.

Here's just a few of the things we do:

Marketing Materials: Brochures, Sell Sheets, Folders and Catalogs

Corporate Identity: Letterhead, Envelopes, Business Cards and Note Cards

P.O.P. & Packaging: Labels, Custom Boxes and Shelf Talkers

Direct Mail Marketing: Postcards, Self-Mailers, Envelope Packets, Magazines and Personalized mailings

Non-Profit and Fund Raising: Appeal Letter Packets, Newsletters, Annual Reports, and Solicitation Mailings

Education: Invitations, Directories, Brochures, Alumni Appeals and much more!

The Goode Co Building
The Goode Co Building
Printing & Direct Response Marketing
Direct Response
Direct Response
Let's collaborate on you next project!
Mailing
Mailing
Many print houses have struggled when adding mailing capabilities, likewise when mail houses add print. We have been running both, side by side, under one roof, for over thirty years. We have consistently proven that by growing our company offering both print and mail solutions, there's little we can't handle.
Digital Printing
Digital Printing
Our array of digital presses offer excellent image quality for both black & white and full-color printing. Digital printing provides our customers with the advantage of doing very short print runs quickly as well as creating highly personalized print pieces, because each digital print is a one-off original!
Offset Printing
Offset Printing
At The Goode Company we have a diverse mix of offset printing equipment and capabilities designed to meet the wide ranging needs and goals of our customers. Our 6-color sheet-fed press has in line aqueous coating and delivers exceptional quality on a variety of material from coated paper for brochures and marketing materials to 24-point board for packaging applications. We also have several 2-color presses we use for stationery, invitations, business cards and other smaller projects.
Fullfilment
Fullfilment
One of the advantages to having a 77,000-square-foot facility is that we have much more open space than most printing companies, and we utilize much of that warehousing area to help our customers address their product distribution and inventory maintenance needs.
Eco - Friendly Printing
Eco - Friendly Printing

News Archive


Why You Need a MultiChannel Marketing Strategy
08 September, 2017

We live in an era of gadgets. Research shows that 94% of people have their cellphone within arm’s reach at all times, consumers are shopping on tablets while watching television, and more email is opened on mobile devices than a desktop. Customers continue to move into a multichannel world, and responsive marketers need to go there, too.

Channel integration isn’t something marketers can afford to ignore. According to Target Marketing’s Media Usage Survey, 37% of marketers’ 2016 budgets went to online marketing, 29% went to print (direct mail, magazines, newspapers), and 21% went to live events. The rest was split between radio, television, and space advertising.

Even as direct mail remains the bedrock of highly effective marketing campaigns, digital components are increasingly part of the mix. According to Target Marketing, the following digital channels are growing the most rapidly:

• Online advertising (54%)
• Email (49%)
• Mobile marketing (38%)
• Search engine marketing (41%)
• Search engine optimization (43%)
• Social media engagement (55%)
• Social media advertising (49%)

Consumers’ lives are multichannel, so marketing is increasingly multichannel, too.

The multichannel approach also produces better results. In a data analysis of retailers, McKinsey found that the more channels customer use to engage with the store, the more they spend on an annual basis. Customers who shopped both in store and who used catalogs spent three times more than those who did not. When Internet marketing is added to the mix, revenue grows by four times. Likewise, customers who shopped online spent four times as much when catalogs were added to the mix and six times more when they also shopped in store.


How the Brain Responds to Print vs. Digital
26 July, 2017

One of the marketing surprises of the last few years has been how strongly Millennials—the smartphone and fully wired generation—respond to direct mail. In fact, according to "USPS Mail Moments 2016," Millennials are more likely to read, organize, and sort their mail than all other generations. They are also less likely to discard their mail without reading it.

Why do so-called digital natives still respond so strongly to print? Could it be, in part, how we are wired? The answer is yes. Neuromarketing research shows that our brains react differently to printed material than to digital media.

To more fully understand how the brain reacts to physical vs. digital mail, the United States Postal Service partnered with the Center for Neural Decision Making at Temple University's Fox School of Business to gauge responses to physical and digital advertising pieces. Researchers used brain images, biometrics (e.g. heart rate and respiration), eye tracking, and questionnaires to measure reactions.

They found that:

  • Participants processed digital ad content more quickly.
  • They spent more time with physical ads.
  • Physical ads triggered activity in a part of the brain that corresponds with value and desirability.
  • Participants had a stronger emotional response to physical ads and remembered them better.

Canada Post found similarly intriguing results in its neuromarketing research project. They measured the response to campaigns that used the same creative and messaging for both physical and digital media.

They found that:

  • Direct mail campaigns required 21% less cognitive effort to process.
  • Participants' recall was 70% higher if they were exposed to direct mail rather than a digital ad.
  • Activation in parts of the brain that correspond to motivation response was 20% higher for direct mail.

As human beings, we are wired to respond more strongly to physical, printed messages. For marketers who want advertising with long-lasting impact and easy recollection, printed materials can clearly make a difference.

Excerpted and edited from the USPSDelivers.com presentation "Still Relevant: A Look at How Millennials Respond to Direct Mail" (2017).


Looking for better response from your marketing? Add Color!
24 May, 2017

When we think about adding color to marketing pieces, we often think about photos, charts, and graphs. But color can be added in many other ways, as well. These include highlight text, brightly colored banners, borders, and backgrounds, and symbols such as starbursts and arrows.

Why think about more places to add color? According to Shoshana Burger, director of corporate strategy and customer insights for X-Rite Pantone, there are some powerful reasons:

  • People are 78% more likely to remember words and phrases in color.
  • Time spent reading a document is 80% higher in color.
  • Basic understanding of content is 80% higher in color.
  • Color increases brand recognition by 87%.
  • 65% of purchasing decisions involve color.
  • Color printing is 55% more likely to be read than black-and-white.
  • Response time is 30% faster in color.
  • When used in promotions, color increases the likelihood of purchase by 80%.

"Eighty percent of our human experience is filtered through visual cues," noted Burger, speaking in a presentation titled "The Power of Color in Communications," hosted by Printing Impressions magazine. "Color also creates an emotional connection. Choosing the right color, and how that color conveys to the right user, is important."

So look for ways to increase the use of color in your next marketing piece. Add a colored background to a text box. Use highlight color in your text to draw attention to offers or critical product details. Add an extra image, chart, or graph, or enlarge a colorful image that you already have.

Whatever you do, get more color in there! 


3 Tips for Maximizing Your Print Investment
05 April, 2017

Are you tired of hearing people talk about the benefits of going entirely paperless? We are! Especially when it comes to marketing, that’s just not a smart move. When our inboxes are clogged with spam and any company can look big and successful online, print carries weight and inspires confidence in a way that digital channels do not. People just trust print more.

While digital channels have their place, now is not the time to give up print. But smart marketers are making their print contacts even more powerful. Let’s take a look at three strategies that can help you make the most of your investment.

1. Focus on recent customers. Clients who have purchased from you recently know who you are. They may just need a simple reminder, such as a postcard or letter, to give them a reason to buy from you again. If you’re looking to stretch your marketing dollars, try focusing on recent customers first.


2. Know your top customers. Pay particular attention to retaining customers with the highest profit margin. Then target prospects with similar profiles so you can reap new customers that are likely to be profitable, as well. If you don’t know who your top customers are, a proactive investment in data analysis can reap big returns.


3. Be relevant. You can only satisfy buyer motivations if you understand what your prospects love and hate—their hearts’ desires and what keeps them awake at night. Knowing your customers and engaging in sincere dialogue about what they want and why they want it will pay off in repeat sales and quality referrals.


Print marketing is evolving. Success is no longer based on trying to get a “same to all” message in front of as many people as possible. It’s about marketing smart and marketing relevant, and using the tangible, confidence-building medium of print to its maximum advantage.


How Loyal Are Your Customers Really?
19 October, 2016

Did you know that even the most satisfied customers can switch to the competition?

In a customer satisfaction study of 10 major industries, an average of 72% of the respondents indicated that they were highly satisfied with the products or services received. Yet 88% said that they were willing to switch providers for any reason. If that startles you, it should!

How do you know which customers are most likely to defect? In his book, The One Number You Need to Grow, Fred Reichheld contends that customer loyalty can be measured by asking customers a single question: How likely would you be to recommend our company to a friend?

Reichheld found that the percentage of customers enthusiastic enough to refer a friend or colleague directly correlates with growth rates among competitors in many industries. Recommendation is one of the strongest signs of loyalty. Customers who make referrals are putting their own reputations on the line. They take this risk only if they are loyal.

Undoubtedly, many of your competitors offer quality products and services with prices and delivery standards that are reasonable or excellent. How can you attract and win new customers while fostering loyalty among your current ones?

All things being equal, customers will go where they consistently feel well treated and appreciated. So be intentional about your communication. Don’t only contact your customers when you want to sell them something. Offer useful tips. Send newsletters, press releases, and case studies, as well as relevant product information and timely incentives.

Although direct mail is often viewed as a way of winning new customers, its effectiveness as a customer loyalty tool should not be overlooked. Set up a series of “nurturing” mailers throughout the year. Implement a continuous client contact program that will demonstrate at regular, pre-planned intervals that you honestly and sincerely care about their well-being.

Communicate, cross-sell, educate, and survey your existing customers, and watch their loyalty grow.


How to Make Sure Your Press Release is Noticed
17 May, 2016

Press Releases are a great way to reach all types of news outlets with your marketing message. However, if they’re done incorrectly, your marketing efforts could end up in the trash before they ever take off in the first place.

Let’s explore some key tips that you should always remember when you’re writing for a news outlet and trying to get your story heard.

When to Use Releases
Press Releases should be used for special occasions. If you’re constantly contacting a news organization, your business will lose its luster quickly. But if you plan out when your press releases are a big deal, you’ll have more success. Consider writing one for your biggest event of the year that impacts the community, or when there’s a huge change at your company that people would be interested in. Use sparingly, but always use press releases for big announcements.

Format Your Release
You never know what type of computer your recipient is using to open your emails. That’s why it is standard practice to paste the release (no more than one page) into the body of the email. No attachments, no hassle. Use a captivating headline as your subject line and make sure to add a “-30-” at the very end. This signifies that you’re done with the release.

Don’t forget to add a small blurb at the bottom of the release explaining what your company is and what it does. Never assume that the news outlet knows anything about your organization. Plus, this way you get to put your best foot forward.

Find the Right Contacts
The more you send out press releases, the more you’ll know about sending to the right people. Sometimes, news outlets are kind enough to tell you if you’ve mailed to the wrong person. Most times, they’ll hit the delete button if it wasn’t meant for them.

Make sure that you do careful research to find out the current person you should be sending your releases to.

Make People Care
The most important part of a press release is to remember that you might care, but you need to convince others to care just as much. Find the angle that convinces the news organization that the community MUST know about what’s going on. Considering your audience is one of the best tips to remember for all of your marketing efforts.


Survey: Data-Driven Marketing Is Critical to Success
02 March, 2016

According to a survey by Forbes Insights, 64% of global marketers “strongly agree” that data-driven marketing is crucial to success within a hyper-competitive global economy. An additional 27% agree. This makes 91% of marketers surveyed agreeing or strongly agreeing with the crucial nature of data.

Not only do marketers agree that data-driven marketing is critical, but they are seeing tangible benefits of their efforts. Nearly half—47%— strongly agree that there are “a number of tangible benefits” being realized for their data-driven marketing strategies. An additional 41% agree, making a total of 84%.

Other findings from the survey indicate that . . .

• senior leaders within organizations support and advocate for data initiatives,
• there is enterprise-wide vision for data analytics within organizations, and
• there is an urgency to conduct data-driven marketing campaigns.

There is no getting around the increasing importance of data in today’s marketing strategies, whether global or local. Marketers have more than good intentions. They are putting those strategies into action. How are you keeping pace?
Talk to us about starting or improving your data-driven marketing strategies today!

Data is derived from a survey of 162 U.S.-based senior executives conducted by Forbes Insights in September 2015. Respondents represented a range of industries, including retail, telecom, technology, consumer packaged goods, automotive, banking, advertising/marketing, energy, travel, media, and insurance. All companies had at least $250 million in annual revenues.


Keys to Content Marketing
08 June, 2015

It’s well into 2015, the year of content marketing. Every marketer has been trying to increase sales with branded content. What exactly is content marketing? It’s basically branded business storytelling. It’s sharing your professional, company and employee stories with your audience to cultivate a client relationship. People tend to trust brands more when they are humanized. Here are three tips to creating your own content marketing strategy:

Do your research—Complete a comprehensive analysis into your audience, trends, media and competition. These areas will address the “who, what, where, and why” of your content marketing. Next, a strategy will naturally evolve from the research.

Tell a story—Your audience wants to see the human side of your company. They’re interested in the values and employees of your company. A story engages the emotional side of your audience and captures their attention.

Create a conversation—After you have published your story or stories and captivated your audience, it’s important to keep up that humanizing factor by allowing your audience to comment on your blog articles and social media posts. More importantly, respond to them in a colloquial (but not slang) manner, to show them you care about cultivating a client relationship.

 


12 Steps For Dealing With Bad Online Reviews
22 September, 2014

For businesses, online reviews can be a very scary thing. Though they are useful tools for consumers, they also give customers the power to take down a brand. Even just one bad review can cast a shadow over your reputation and deter potential clients.

It might feel like you have no control over what is said about your brand online, but you do have the opportunity to display your excellent customer service and diffuse the effects of any inflammatory comments. Keep these steps in mind when you come across a bad online review of your business:

Prevention is better than cure. It might seem obvious, but the best way to prevent bad online reviews is to prevent bad customer experiences from happening. If you are aware of a client who is particularly unhappy, do everything you can to rectify the situation before they take their frustration online.

Set a Google Alert for your business. If things are being said about your company online, you’ll be notified right away.

Contact the review site. If you come across a bad review that is factually incorrect, it’s worth it to contact the site and ask if they will remove it. Most won’t unless you have hard proof that the customer’s claim is wrong.

Realize the difference between a claim that is factually incorrect and an opinion that you don’t agree with. It’s easy to feel defensive about the business that you built, but whether or not you agree with the customer’s complaint, they have a right to be heard.

Decide if you’re going to deal with the issue publicly or privately. This is a personal choice, but responding to the customer in the same forum allows you to display your excellent customer service.

ALWAYS remain calm. It’s never a good idea to respond with anger or attempt to argue with a bad review. If you start an argument, people who see the site will automatically side with the customer, making your business look even worse. It might be difficult, but you must respond in a respectful and professional manner.

Try to put yourself in the customer’s shoes. Though the issue might seem incredibly minor to you, it is clearly a big deal for the reviewer. Don’t disregard the complaint just because you have different priorities.

Own up to specific mistakes. Did you overbook your services and fail to meet your promised delivery date? Own up to it. While excuses will make you look unprofessional, a brief explanation and admission of your error will show that you’re taking steps to improve your service.

Have a system of response in place. In case you would have to deal with multiple less-than-great reviews, have a company-wide policy for responses. Consistency and efficiency are key.

Encourage positive reviews from satisfied customers. This does not mean begging people to write things that will make you look good. If someone is particularly pleased with your service, simply say, “We love getting feedback from our customers, so we always appreciate online reviews of our business.”

Whatever you do, DO NOT post fake reviews. Most review sites have software in place that tracks businesses who write fake reviews for themselves. You will get caught. You will look stupid.

See the silver lining. A bad review, devastating as it may be, also adds some authenticity to your business. Companies with perfect 5-star ratings can come across as too good to be true. See the situation as the perfect opportunity to show off your company’s excellent customer service.


What To Do When Your Content Marketing Consistently Flops
02 September, 2014

It’s the painful truth. Your content marketing is more likely to fail than it is to succeed.

As disappointing as that may be, developing content marketing is still a necessary part of your business’s success. But why is no one reading your content even when you pour your heart and soul into creating it?

When it comes to content marketing, an “If you build it, they will come” mentality doesn’t apply. Just because you put out something that you think is great doesn’t mean that it’s going to get you tons of page views and sales.

Because content marketing is more of an art than a science, there’s no precise formula for success. But there’s no need to get discouraged. These tips can help you get back on your feet after your content marketing flops:

It’s about quality AND quantity. It’s impossible to establish yourself or your brand as a thought leader if you only have one great thought. The more awesome content you put out there, the more likely you are to develop a larger readership.

Get above the noise with your message. If a tree falls in the forest when no one is around, does it still make a sound? Well if that tree is content marketing, it really doesn’t matter if no one is going to hear it anyway. The Content Marketing Forest is filled with countless trees all falling down at the same time. Figure out a way to get above that noise and make a different and bigger impact with your tree’s tumble.

Remember that it’s not all about you. A hard sell has no place in content marketing. Stop talking about what your company does and start offering content that is relevant and useful to your potential customers’ lives.

Develop a strategy that goes beyond the content. Again, this isn’t Field of Dreams. Putting content up on your blog just isn’t enough. You need to develop a solid content distribution plan that gets your stuff to the right audience.

Learn from your mistakes. It’s easy to get caught up in content creation without ever stepping back to examine your success (or lack thereof). Pay attention to analytics and note what does and doesn’t work for your audience so you can adjust your strategy accordingly.

Emulate content marketing geniuses. What content do you find yourself reading? Who dominates content marketing in your industry? Invest time in observing fantastic content and figuring out how to adapt successful tactics for yourself. But don’t mistake imitation for emulation. You won’t succeed if you don’t carve out a unique niche for your business.

Don’t give up. Content marketing is tricky. You’re going to strike out frequently, but that’s okay. The most important thing is to keep producing content and use smart strategies to improve it as you go.

 


How To Turn Your Employees Into Social Brand Advocates
25 June, 2014

Your very best brand advocates are sitting in the cubicles right outside your door. They know what makes your company great, and they most likely have social media networks that extend far beyond your marketing’s reach. Hearing positive things about a business from an employee conveys that your company is trustworthy, so if you aren’t giving your employees the tools they need to be brand advocates, you should start immediately. These are the things you’ll need to do:

Develop a great company social media policy.
This doesn’t mean creating a gigantic list of “don’ts.” Though you may have visions of lawsuits and scandals dancing in your head, you need to stop viewing your employees promoting your brand on social media as a risk and instead view it as a fantastic opportunity. A rigid policy will make your employees afraid to post anything, so build one that’s based on common sense, transparency and trust. And as new events and announcements arise, be clear with the entire company when information can be posted on social media and when it needs to remain classified. If you really want to be thorough, develop playbooks for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and any other platforms you may use that give concrete examples and tips for good posts.

Invest in social media training.
Whether your company is filled with Millennials or soon-to-be retirees, every employee can benefit from social media training. Bring in a professional or have the director of your company’s social media team host various training sessions, ranging in complexity from the basics of creating profiles to advanced personal branding. It might seem like an unnecessary expense, but it’s a step that will empower every employee to represent your brand well.

Make sure you have a company culture worth bragging about.
As the saying goes, don’t talk the talk if you can’t walk the walk. Before you can convert your employees into brand advocates, you have to build an organization that treats both its customers and its employees extremely well. Are you hosting fun employee events that demonstrate your appreciation for the hard work that they do? Are you consistently developing exciting new products and services? Is your customer service worth talking about? Don’t expect your brand advocates to search for things to talk about or, worse yet, lie. Give them the materials they need to work with.


What Twitter’s New Mute Feature Means For Marketers
11 June, 2014

We all have that one friend. They’re opinionated, often uninformed and have no filter whatsoever. And for some reason, we follow them on Twitter. If you’ve ever wished that you could find a switch to turn off their half-baked tweets for a few days (or months, or years…), now you can.

Twitter recently unveiled a new “mute” feature that allows you to remove a user’s tweets and retweets from your timeline and block their push or SMS notifications. The silenced user will not be notified of their “muted” status, as they can still send you direct messages and favorite, reply to and retweet your tweets. This means that you’re only one click away from silencing someone you follow in a way that leaves them blissfully unaware.

While this might be great news for personal users, this is somewhat terrifying for marketers. Though someone who is truly annoyed with a company’s Twitter activity is more likely to unfollow than mute, they still have the option to shut off your tweets during particularly tweet-heavy days, like when you’re conducting a Twitter-based live interview or real-time tweeting a major event. For the first time since Twitter’s launch, there’s no guarantee that all of your followers are seeing your tweets in their timeline.

What you tweet has always been important, but now it could be what keeps you from (or causes you to be) muted. Here are some crucial things to keep in mind:

Give the people what they want.
94% of Twitter users want discounts and promotions from the brands they follow, and 87% are hoping to be entertained. Deliver on these desires and keep your tweets both fun and valuable. Always ask yourself what your tweet is offering to your followers. Whether it’s an interesting image or a chance for a giveaway, give something that separates your tweets from the unnecessary noise.

Tread lightly.
This should go without saying, but unfortunately several major brands have broken this rule: NEVER appropriate a well known tragedy, disaster, or conflict for your branding. The only way to comment on such events is with seriousness, respect and absolutely no mention of your company. The attention you might receive for incorporating a catastrophic happening into your marketing is not worth the inevitability of offending your followers.

It’s a dialogue, not a monologue.
Twitter should be used as a tool that facilitates conversations between businesses and consumers. Reply to mentions, both positive and negative, and remember to keep a conversational tone. You’ll increase your company’s approachability and appeal by making sure your tweets don’t sound too formal.

 


Using Print to Drive Social Media Engagement
27 May, 2014

We often think about print and social media as being competitors, but print can be one of the greatest drivers of social media engagement, as well. Take a lesson from Skinny Cow, which uses print to drive participation in its social media and mobile contests.
 
To engage consumers, the company offers daily giveaways. To participate, consumers must purchase a Skinny Cow product such as cheese or ice cream bar at a retail location. Consumers type in the barcode or six-digit game code from the box or wrapper to see if they have won. They can tweet about the contest to gain an additional chance to win.
 
By printing codes on its product packaging, Skinny Cow drives traffic into its retail stores. Once consumers have provided their mobile numbers to enter the contest, it can begin to send them push notifications, as well. Tweeting multiples the impact of the campaign at no additional cost.
 
Printing personalized barcodes and game codes on boxes, labels, and wrappers is a simple operation and can be adapted to many different consumer products. Codes can be overprinted or, if you are printing in small quantities, digitally printed right onto the package. You can also print personalized barcodes, QR Codes, or promo codes on napkins, cups, and other disposable items used by the consumer.
 
If you don’t produce the types of consumer products that lend themselves to these types of promo codes, you can drive foot traffic by printing generic codes or “secret URLs” on office, in-store, or even trade show displays, banners, and signage. Change them out frequently to prevent sharing.
 
Print and mobile / social media don’t have to be competitors. In fact, print may be one of the primary ways consumers find you on social and mobile media.
 
For more information, 

3 Marketing Lessons We Learned From Our Moms
13 May, 2014

Last Sunday was Mother’s Day, and it got us thinking about all of the amazing things that our moms do for us. They’re also very skilled in the art of persuasion (you still eat your broccoli, don’t you?) Check out these great marketing lessons that we learned from our moms, and give your mom a hug while you’re at it:

1. Always make your message clear. Moms know to never leave anything open to interpretation. You should communicate with your customers in direct, easy to understand ways, telling them exactly what you want them to do and how to do it. And of course, just like Mom, do it with love.

2. Sometimes a whisper is more effective than a shout. You know those moments when your mom suddenly got very quiet and very intense? That was a sure sign that it was time to listen. You can capture your audience’s attention the same way. Instead of always trying to be the loudest and flashiest company, learn to convey powerful messages in simpler ways.

3. Don’t be afraid to have fun. Some of the best memories with our moms are the ones where we played hookie, built blanket forts, or ate large quantities of ice cream. It’s good to get down to business with your marketing, but always remember to have some fun with it. Your customers will appreciate and remember you for it.


Marketing to Millennials: Just Tell a Good Story
29 April, 2014

There’s a new kid in town and they’re looking to spend. Yes, our latest young professionals that have been coming online in recent years are from the millennial generation. And these aren’t your parent’s consumers. If you’re looking to get a piece of their pocketbook, you have to understand how to change your marketing message to grab their attention—and there’s a lot of noise for them out there. Here are a few ways to have some impact in the market.

Find Your Zen
If you’re going to market to millennials you have to think about your business holistically. You can’t force marketing on your product or a millennial won’t buy your product—or your message. Product design and the marketing message are inseparable. Think Apple. So take a look at your products and truly understand the “why.” This will give your marketing meaning.

Get Real
Millennials can smell a rat. They’ve grown up sharing their lives with the world. They want authenticity in their relationships, and that includes relationships with the companies that sell them their stuff. The easiest way to understand how you can market to them is to listen. This will give you an opportunity to weave your product story into their story and show them that they’ve been heard. Speak in their language. The casual tone may bother you at first because it may feel unprofessional. But the kids will dig it if you do.

Let All of Those Emotions Out
If you develop a good story around your products, it humanizes your brand. Now you’re a person talking to a person. That’s the foundation of human existence. That vulnerability may have you squirming in your seat, but you’re going to build a level of trust that millennials crave.


Expect the Unexpected for Marketing in 2014
02 April, 2014

So what can you expect for the world of marketing in 2014? Unpredictability. There’s no such thing as a sure thing when it comes to business, so creating an accurate forecast of the next year is impossible. After all, who saw Snapchat’s crazy rise to success coming in 2013? There’s no way to determine what The Next Big Thing will be, but that doesn’t mean that you have to be anxious and unprepared.

The only thing you can count on is yourself, so gearing up for the rest of the year will allow you to navigate the changes that lie ahead. Here are some ways to develop maximum marketing adaptability:

Get your ducks in a row.
You won’t be able to keep up with changing situations and trends if you don’t have a clear idea of what you’ve done in the past. What channels or campaigns have worked best? Do you have a system of tracking customer behavior? By organizing a history of your marketing efforts, you’ll be able to identify what will (and won’t) be effective in the future.

Identify the story that you’re trying to tell with your brand.
By now you might have an established narrative, but make sure that the storytelling concept is fully concrete. Outlining what your brand is and isn’t will allow you to make easy decisions when new trends and platforms emerge.

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.
Perhaps in two months, an exciting new social media platform will become all the rage. Don’t hesitate to check out what the buzz is all about, but don’t feel like you have to invest all your time in energy in the latest social media fad. If its capabilities and reach align with your brand’s goals, then jump right in. But also know that there’s no point in letting something new (and not fully established) detract from your other marketing efforts.

Have different team plans in place.
As different options and campaigns come up, make sure you have different teams and team members who can handle various tasks. Marketing is reliant on timeliness, so you don’t want to waste any time trying to figure out who can do what. By appointing roles ahead of time (and knowing that flexibility will be required) you’ll be able to tackle issues and opportunities as soon as they arise.


Marketing Lessons From One of Ireland’s Most Iconic Brands
02 April, 2014

When people think about Ireland, the Guinness Storehouse is often the first thing that comes to mind. But that hasn’t always been the case. In fact, the Guinness Storehouse didn’t even exist 15 years ago. So how did Guinness develop the number one tourist attraction in Ireland and reinvigorate its brand? By carefully examining its marketing and crafting a well thought-out branded space.

Grainne Wafer, one of the senior global marketers on the Guinness brand, explained, "The Storehouse is a fantastic way for people to experience and engage with the Guinness brand. But what we are really trying to do...is make it as rewarding, enjoyable, engaging and as participative as possible. That’s true with everything we try to do on the Guinness brand in terms of marketing.”

So whether you’re a large organization with an interesting history or a small startup, these lessons from Guinness can apply to your marketing:

Focus on interaction.
The Guinness Storehouse is carefully designed to encourage interaction with the brand, but also between visitors. There are digital games, bars and even a class on pouring the perfect pint to get people talking. Wafer said, “It’s a place for interaction among tourists who are traveling around Ireland, for the people who live there and for the new Guinness employees who are undergoing training.” In addition, visitors can use the giant interactive wall (one of the largest in the world) to leave messages that connect to their social media.

Tell a story.
Visitors’ exploration of the Guinness Storehouse begins with a guide telling them the origins of the brand. Preserved in the floor of the entryway is the 9,000 year lease that Arthur Guinness signed in 1759. As visitors continue on their self-guided tours, they learn about and interact with more historical facts, the actual brewing process and the evolution of Guinness’s marketing. At every point, the Guinness Storehouse invites visitors to be a part of the brand’s fascinating story.

Know your audience.
Before the Guinness Storehouse was built, the company recognized that it needed to start thinking about how to bring in the next generation of Guinness drinkers. They understood that people typically start engaging with the brand in their mid-twenties, so the design of the Guinness Storehouse is meant to attract “guys and girls who are at their first job stage, who are progressing a bit more.” The advanced technology and the juxtaposition of the building’s old exterior and strikingly modern interior serve to accomplish this goal.

Title Name Email Phone
VP of Sales and Marketing Bryan Neill bryan.neill@thegoodeco.com 707-588-8028
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