COMPANY PROFILE

AMORIM CORK AMERICA

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Address

360 Devlin Rd.
Napa
CA, 94558
United States
Phone
(707) 224-6000
Fax
(707) 224-7616
Primary
Amorim Customer Support Team

About Our Company

Founded in 1870 by the Amorim family, the company has grown to become the largest producer of natural cork wine cork closures in the world.

With over 3 billion corks sold annually in more than 37 countries, Amorim corks are the gold standard for quality and performance. The company maintains absolute control over every aspect of manufacturing.

In 2007, Amorim became the first cork supplier in the world to receive FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certification from the Rainforest Alliance for its natural cork closures.

These prestigious certifications are your guarantee that corks grown and manufactured under this accreditation meet the highest standards of sustainable, socially responsible forestry practices.

Our Products & Services


Our Natural Cork Stoppers are the best money can buy. They are available as Forest Stewardship Council Certified Wood. These wine corks are 100% natural cork and are produced with the highest degree of care and quality. The ideal stopper for wines with long bottle aging potential.

Our ROSA-Treated Twin Top® wine corks set the standard for technical stoppers. They are ideal for fruity wines not requiring long bottle aging. This stopper retains the benefits of a natural cork closure with the added protection of a ROSA-treated product. The ideal stopper for wine consumed within 5 years.

ROSA-Treated Neutrocork® is an agglomerated wine cork stopper made from ROSA-treated cork particles. It is intended for wines of early consumption in which price and excellent sealing ability are important. The ideal stopper for wine consumed in 1 to 2 years.

Acquamark® cork is a natural product designed as a low-cost alternative for wines meant for early consumption.

SPARK® premium sparkling wine corks are the first choice of sparkling winae and champagne winemakers. This product provides an exceptional seal with ease of application. It is the benchmark of quality worldwide.

T-Cork®, often referred to as a Bar Top stopper, is a natural cork stopper available in a wide range of cap top materials. Because of its sealing ability and reuse feature, it is the ideal solution for bottling fortified wines and spirits.

ND Tech - Amorim
ND Tech - Amorim
ndTech individually-inspect each and every cork that goes through the process and guarantees then all to be TCA-free at human sensory threshold levels.
Amorim Cork
Amorim Cork
Cork Stoppers Process

News Archive


Amorim's NDtech Awarded as one of the Most Innovative Products from Wine Business for 2019!
17 May, 2019

This year’s winners were selected by the Wine Business Monthly editorial staff, together with the 2019 Innovation + Quality Advisory Board, from a large pool of entries – including new products featured in Wine Business Monthly throughout the past year plus submissions from winemakers around the world. The judging criteria? Innovation and relevance to ultra-premium wineries. Amongst the winners was our NDtech product. We are thrilled!

NDtech by Amorim 

Following a 5-year, €10 million research and development investment, Amorim released NDTech, an individualized quality control screening technology for natural cork stoppers that promises to be a natural cork with a non-detectable TCA guarantee (releasable TCA content at or below the 0.5 ng/L quantification limit; analysis performed in accordance to ISO 20752).


State of the Art Wine Cork Production
10 July, 2017

Amorim is the biggest world producer of cork products and one of the most international of all Portuguese companies, with operations in dozens of countries and all continents.

Amorim’s focus is to produce the finest quality natural corks available.

To do this the company has invested nearly $60 million U.S. dollars over the last six years on new plants, new processes and staff training. The results speak for themselves.

Click here for more information. 


State of the Art Wine Cork Production
10 July, 2017

Amorim is the biggest world producer of cork products and one of the most international of all Portuguese companies, with operations in dozens of countries and all continents.

Amorim’s focus is to produce the finest quality natural corks available.

To do this the company has invested nearly $60 million U.S. dollars over the last six years on new plants, new processes and staff training. The results speak for themselves.

Click here for more information. 


North Americans Prefer Cork Stoppers
26 December, 2016

Recent market research conducted in the USA and Canada provides further confirmation that cork is the preferred wine stopper for consumers, who are willing to pay a significant premium for cork-finished wines.

The preference for cork delivers a major difference in terms of the sales potential of wines.

According to recent data on the US market disclosed by Nielsen Scanning Statistics, for the Top 100 Premium Wine Brands during the 6-year period between June 2010 and June 2016, cork finished wines have enjoyed a 42% increase in sales compared to a 13% increase for wines using alternative closures.

Over the last six years brands finished with cork have enjoyed more robust sales growth than brands finished with alternatives closures and the number of top brands using cork closures is increasing.

Cork-finished wines retail at a significant price premium. Amongst the top 100 Premium Brands the median sales price for cork finished wines, was $13.56 – which is $3.80 (+39%) higher than the median price of wines sealed with alternative closures.

A separate study for the Canadian market, published in July, 2016 by the American Association of Wine Economists, “Importance of eco-logo and closure type on consumer expectations, price perception and willingness to purchase wines in Canada” indicated that cork finished wines are preferred by Canadian consumers, who are willing to pay CAN$1.69 and CAN$1.29 more for wines sealed with natural corks compared to those sealed with synthetic or screw cap closures, respectively.

The study highlights the fact that for consumers the type of stopper is perceived as a key indicator of both a wine’s quality and also influences perception of its eco-friendliness and thus has a major impact on purchase decisions.

Furthermore, the study revealed that eco- conscious consumers pay significantly greater attention to the use of natural cork stoppers than any other environmental friendly claims, including the presence of eco-logos on the wine label.

Further analysis on recent trends in the North American wine industry is provided in an article published in February, 2016 in The Atlantic magazine, entitled “How Millennials (Almost) Killed the Wine Cork”.

The article suggests that Millenials (i.e. persons born after the mid-1980s) were initially keen to try out alternative closures, as part of a wider attraction to try out new trends, but have now shifted strongly back in favour of cork, in particular due to its quality and sustainability credentials.

The article clarifies that key factors explaining the progressive appeal of cork amongst all wine consumers, including Millenials, are the rigorous quality control measures that have been adopted in the cork industry, delivering a 95 percent reduction in TCA since 2001 according to tests conducted by the Cork Quality Council, and growing awareness of cork’s multiple environmental benefits.

These findings for the North American market confirm recent market research that has consistently shown that over 85% of wine consumers in other key world markets - such as France, China, Italy and Spain – overwhelmingly prefer cork, which is valued as a guarantee of quality, a natural and environmentally friendly closure, and an integral part of the wine and spirits experience.


AMORIM: PORTUGUESE CORK EXPORTS TO HIT €1BN BY 2017
12 August, 2016

Head of the world’s largest cork producer, Antonio Amorim, believes that Portuguese cork exports will reach €1 billion by 2017.

“I believed that Portuguese cork exports would reach €1 billion in 2020, but now I think they will reach that in 2017,” he told the drinks business during a meeting in Portugal last month.

Continuing, he explained that reaching €1 billion in exports would require Portugal’s stopper business to increase by €100m from €900m today, and, in terms of volume, that would represent a growth of 1 billion corks.

Helping cork reach this target is both increasing wine sales in markets such as the US and China, growing fine wine sales, a surging sparkling wine business and, he hopes, a shift to cork from other types of closure.

“I want us to grow by another 1 billion cork stoppers and I want to get that back from plastics and screwcaps,” he said.

However, he also said that other trends would help the cork business, with US and China both growth areas due to the expanding wine market in these countries, and the fact that both these nations have a preference for cork-sealed bottles.

He also mentioned the growth in sparkling wine demand worldwide, which are products almost entirely closed with cork, while stating Amorim’s dominance when it comes to sealing sparkling wines.

“We bought in 2007 and 2012 the two most important competitors we had in sparkling stoppers and now, without acquisitions, we are growing organically,” he said, referring to Amorim’s purchase of Spain’s Oller Group in 2007 and then, five years later, Trefinos, a holding company with six firms in Spain, France and Italy that produce sparkling wine stoppers.

Speaking about the top-end of the still wine business, he said that volumes were small but growing.

“Last year in Bordeaux they were bottling the 2013 vintage, and they had ... 

Continue reading at The Drinks Business - http://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2016/07/amorim-wants-to-grow-by-one-billion-corks/


Cork Stoppers Mean Quality Wine
18 July, 2016

Consumers believe that cork best preserves the natural properties of wines. They are willing to pay between R$ 13.00 (€4.05) and R$ 15.00 (€4.67) more for a wine sealed with a natural cork stopper Brazilian consumers consider that the type of stopper used in a wine bottle is an indicator of its quality, according to the latest study commissioned by APCOR – the Portuguese Cork Association, conducted by Ibope / Conecta in the Brazilian market. Cork is considered to be a premium raw material that adds value to wine.

According to the study, consumers are willing to pay between R$ 13.00 (€4.05) and R$ 15.00 (€4.67) more for a wine sealed with a natural cork stopper. This is a clear sign of the valorisation of a wine associated to a cork stopper, in comparison with wines sealed with other types of stoppers – such as plastic stoppers or aluminium screwcaps. This perception also extends to younger age groups. In this context, 80% of respondents associate natural cork stoppers to the upper tier of wines and consider that cork is the solution which best preserves the natural properties of wines. This factor is also directly linked to respondents’ social class. For example respondents from the social class A also identify opening a bottle sealed with a cork stopper as a moment of unique charm – provided by the characteristic “popping” sound that is one of the most recognizable sounds in the world. 50% of respondents also value cork’s sustainable credentials, the only option that constitutes a natural, clean and renewable stopper.

  • USA 94% of consumers prefer natural cork stoppers (Tragon Corp.)
  • Italy 85% of consumers consider that cork is the best stopper to ensure the quality of wine (AstraRicerche)
  • France 89% of wine drinkers prefer cork stoppers and 89.8% state that cork stoppers preserve all the wine’s aromas (Ipsos)
  • China 85% of consumers believe that wines sealed with cork are higher quality (CTR Market Research)
  • Spain 92% of consumers prefer cork stoppers (Cork Project)

The Three Ages of Wine Cork Production: A Visit to Corticeira Amorim
17 June, 2016

It is impossible to drive through the Alentejo region of Portugal without seeing the dark trees that dot the landscape. Pretty soon you notice the lines on the trunks where the bark has been harvested and then you know for sure that you are in a cork oak (Quercus suber) forest, the densest concentration of these trees in the world (see map above).

Cork’s Medieval Roots

Planting a cork oak tree is a statement of faith in the future. The first harvest must wait for 15 years and then the cork will be of low quality, unsuitable for natural cork closures. The second and better harvest that yields more usable cork comes 9 years later. Only 9  years after that (and every 9 years into the future) can the highest quality cork be taken. Few other things in the world of wine (producing 40-year old Tawny Port, for example) can compare to cork in terms of optimistic forward thinking.

Sue and I visited both Porto and Alentejo during our recent trip to Portugal and Antonio Amorim and Carlos de Jesus of Corticeira Amorim, the world leader in cork closures, invited us to visit their factories in these two regions to see first-hand what I am calling the Three Ages of cork.

Cork is an ancient product — the Greeks, Egyptians and Romans all sealed their wine jars with cork. The harvesting of it is laborious hand work since each tree has its own configuration. Photos of modern cork

 harvests could easily be mistaken for medieval paintings.

Industrial Revolution

Stepping into the Amorim factory in Coruche, you get an initial sense of moving forward in time to the industrial revolution. There is still a lot of hand work here. Sorting the processed cork bark pieces, for example, still requires human judgement as they are inspected and graded for quality one at a time. The key to making a profit in cork is to waste nothing, so each cork piece must go to its best use and the waste at each step recycled into a lower-priced product.

Almost nothing is thrown away. One item that was headed for the power-supplying waste burner was a piece of cork that was badly infected with TCA, the source of cork taint. What a horrible smell!  Until a machine can consistently detect all the potential problems with cork including TCA, cracking, insect damage and so on, these workers’ jobs are very secure.

The factory was loud with the clamber of industrial machinery as every task that could be mechanized was mechanized. It gave me a sense of what those 19th century British textile mills must have been like.

Interestingly, the finest corks closures made from the best quality raw material are hand-punched by skilled craftsmen (see photo above). These corks need to be as close to perfect as possible and so far nothing can replace the human eye for seeing just where the cork’s sweet spot is (and what parts should be recycled down the line for other products).

NDtech: Cork for the 21st Century

It would be easy to think of cork just this way — a medieval product made using industrial revolution technology — but this viewpoint misses a lot as we learned when we visited Amorim’s second factory near Porto.

Here we saw many of the same processes as in the south, but the focus was different because Carlos and Antonio wanted us to see the progress that has been made at improving cork closures and addressing the issues that allowed synthetic stoppers and screw cap technology to make dramatic inroads in this market.

Innovative new production processes and seriously obsessive attention to detail have now all but eliminated the incidence of detectable TCA contamination in Amorim corks throughout the product line, which is a big deal and came only after intense and expensive research and process innovation. But that was not good enough and so earlier this year Amorim unveiled its latest innovation, NDtech corks.

Amorim scientists guided us into the controlled environment that you see in the video above and we saw the NDtech (think non-detectible TCA levels) process at work. ndTech really does individually-inspect each and every cork that goes through the process and guarantees then all to be TCA-free at human sensory threshold levels.

Amorim is convinced that the process works and we saw persuasive data about these and other Amorim cork closures. Now the challenge is to scale up to meet the demand for these, the very best corks that can be made.

Three Ages in One Product

I find  it interesting that cork is so many things at once. It is a natural product, of course, but one that is necessarily harvested and then processed by hand and manufactured using machines and processes from a variety of periods. It is also increasingly a technological product.

Making excellent cork closures is complicated as we saw at the Amorim factories and doing so profitably is even more complicated. We were impressed with the way that every scrap and bit of cork is put to use in closures and other cork products and every ounce of value realized. Environmental and economic sustainability go hand-in-hand.

Meeting the challenge of synthetic and screw-cap closures has not been easy for cork producers, who saw a some of their market share disappear. Hard work, expensive research and technical innovation has turned this around, however, and now many consumers and wineries who moved away from cork in the past are taking a new look.

Someone once accused the economist John Maynard Keynes of expressing a view that was inconsistent with his previous statements.” When the facts change,” Keynes replied, “I change my opinion. What do you do?” The facts about cork — especially the TCA situation — have changed in the past few years. No wonder many people in the industry have revised their views on cork.

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Many thanks to Antonio Amorim and Carlos de Jesus for he opportunity to see the three ages of cork with our own eyes and learn about the scientific progress from the experts. This concludes the short series of past-present-future stories from the Alentejo. Come back next week for a look at some unexpected wine tourism opportunities we found in Portugal.

To view more on this article visit The Wine Economist


Amorim Delivers World's First Natural Corks With Non-Detectable TCA Guarantee
16 May, 2016

Global Leader in Cork Production Provides U.S. Wineries Innovative Wine Packaging Technology

Amorim (http://www.amorimcork.com/en/), the world’s leading cork producer, has achieved a major technological breakthrough to become the world’s first cork producer to produce and deliver natural cork stoppers to winemakers with a non-detectable TCA guarantee.*

Known as NDtech, the cutting-edge technology greatly enhances Amorim’s quality control measures by screening individual cork stoppers on the production line to eliminate the risk of corks contaminated with 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) reaching winemakers.

“Until now, no cork producer has been able to engage independent, scientific validation for a quality control system for natural cork stoppers that screens corks individually,” said Amorim’s research and development director Dr. Miguel Cabral.

“We have been working to achieve this goal for several years. Now we can examine an individual cork using sophisticated gas chromatography in just seconds, making the technology practical on a major industrial scale.”

Two of the world’s leading wine industry research facilities — Germany’s Hochschule Geisenheim and The Australian Wine Research Institute (AWRI) — are currently engaged in the validation of the performance of NDtech.

“The fact that Amorim’s NDtech is the only individual cork screening technology to engage in validation from both Geisenheim and the AWRI underlines the magnitude of this Amorim technological breakthrough,” said Cabral.

Previously, gas chromatography examination took up to 14 minutes, making it impossible to use on production lines. Instead, Amorim applied the technology in laboratory-controlled batch testing as part of its quality control measures for the 4.2 billion corks it produces each year — and at the same time worked to improve the technology so it could be used in production.

The development of the super-fast NDtech follows a five-year, approximately $10 million research and development investment by Amorim and a partnership with a British company specializing in gas chromatography.

With incredibly high precision, NDtech can detect any cork with more than 0.5 nanograms of TCA per liter (parts per trillion). These corks are removed from the production line automatically.

The level of precision necessary to meet this standard on an industrial scale for the individual corks examined is astounding, especially given that the detection threshold of 0.5 nanograms/liter can be the equivalent of one drop of water in 800 Olympic-size swimming pools.

NDtech is complemented by Amorim’s existing preventive, curative and quality control measures, including the patented ROSA Evolution treatment used during production.

As the world’s leading cork producer, Amorim has stood at the forefront of the fight against TCA — a naturally forming chemical compound that is a problem in the packaged food and beverage industries — through the application of rigorous production standards and certified quality control methods.

“Amorim has experienced phenomenal growth in demand for natural cork stoppers over the past five years with annual sales increasing from three billion cork stoppers to more than four billion,” said Amorim’s chairman and CEO António Amorim.

“This is due, in part, to increasing awareness of cork’s environmental and technical advantages and acknowledgement of the added value that a quality natural cork closure brings to bottled wine. Now, with NDtech, we have made the world’s best wine stopper even better.”

NDtech will initially be applied to Amorim’s top-end natural cork stoppers used on some of the world’s most valuable wine brands. U.S. wineries are among the first to utilize natural cork stoppers that have undergone NDtech screening.

“The initial response from U.S. winemakers has been as positive as we had anticipated, especially given the important role that premium wine packaging has in a market as sophisticated as the United States,” said Amorim Cork America’s general manager Pedro Fernandes.

This groundbreaking technology presents U.S. winemakers with an opportunity to harness the unique benefits of sustainable natural cork knowing that Amorim has examined and guarantees each individual stopper.

“The introduction of NDtech after several years of development again highlights Amorim’s tenacious commitment to continually building upon its well-established and industry-leading quality control measures.”

*A non-detectable TCA guarantee means that if any TCA remains in a cork it is below the detection threshold of 0.5 nanograms/litre.

About Amorim

Tracing its roots back to the 19th century, Amorim (http://www.amorimcork.com/en/) is the largest producer and supplier of cork stoppers worldwide with sales of more than $680 million (€605 million). Amorim sells to over 15,000 active clients in 82 countries, including some of the world’s most renowned wine, Champagne, and spirits producers. With an annual production of more than four billion cork stoppers, it is evident that Amorim is well-equipped to meet the high performance demands of the industry. Additionally, Amorim and its subsidiaries are an integral part of a conservationist effort to guarantee the survival of hundreds of thousands of cork trees throughout the Mediterranean Basin.


Amorim Towards Sustainable Development
25 March, 2016

Amorim is recognized as a global leader in sustainable business practices. Founded in 1870 by the Amorim family, the company has grown to become the largest producer of natural cork wine cork closures in the world.

 

The emergence of a new paradigm – the viability of the activities carried out from a standpoint that simultaneously incorporates the economic, social and environmental aspects of these activities – has determined the growing importance of the contribution of every actor, whether a company or a consumer, to building a better world.

In this area, Amorim, in addition to benefiting from a gift of Nature – transforming a natural raw material, extracted cyclically from the trees without harming them, promoting the economic and social sustainability of areas at risk of desertification, making available high value added products that maintain the unique and intrinsic characteristics of cork, in an integrated transformation process that practically does not produce waste – has regulated its activity by adopting and strengthening sustainable development practices.

In 2007, the company became the first cork supplier in the world to receive FSC® (Forest Stewardship Council™) certification from the Rainforest Alliance for its natural cork closures. These prestigious certifications are your guarantee that corks grown and manufactured under this accreditation meet the highest standards of sustainable, socially responsible forestry practices. Amorim and its subsidiaries are an integral part of a conservationist effort to guarantee the survival of hundreds of thousands of cork trees throughout the Mediterranean Basin, a natural and renewable resource that plays a key role in CO2 retention, in preserving biodiversity and in combating desertification.

 

Did You Know?

Cork Oaks (Quercus Suber) can and live to be over 200 years old.


A Little Bit of Cork History
14 August, 2015

The cork stopper has unique innate qualities, which interact beneficially with wine. It contributes to developing its character, gives it authenticity and brings it value. Cork, which is just as natural and noble as wine, benefits from the production of wine and reciprocates with premium performance stoppers. Both industries have grown together over the centuries.

When Dom Pierre Pérignon decided to swap the wooden stoppers in use in the mid-17th century for cork stoppers, he caused an unprecedented change of events in the wine industry. The French monk, who would become famous for his champagne, sought an alternative to the stoppers used at the time, which were wrapped in hemp soaked in olive oil, failed to provide an effective seal, played a dubious role in the preservation of wine and were always popping out. The solution was cork.

Thousand of years before, the Egyptians had already used cork, followed by the Greeks and Romans, as amphorae discovered in Pompeii bear witness. It was, however, the driving force of Dom Pérignon that paved the way for the use of cork associated with the fast growth of the wine industry. In Portugal, during the following century, where today the centre of the cork and Port Wine industries is found, wine was allowed to age in glass cylindrical bottles for the first time. Thus, it was the simultaneous development of cork stoppers and wine bottles which made the modern wine industry possible.


Amorim Towards Sustainable Development
12 June, 2015

Amorim is recognized as a global leader in sustainable business practices. Founded in 1870 by the Amorim family, the company has grown to become the largest producer of natural cork wine cork closures in the world.

The emergence of a new paradigm – the viability of the activities carried out from a standpoint that simultaneously incorporates the economic, social and environmental aspects of these activities – has determined the growing importance of the contribution of every actor, whether a company or a consumer, to building a better world.

In this area, Amorim, in addition to benefiting from a gift of Nature – transforming a natural raw material, extracted cyclically from the trees without harming them, promoting the economic and social sustainability of areas at risk of desertification, making available high value added products that maintain the unique and intrinsic characteristics of cork, in an integrated transformation process that practically does not produce waste – has regulated its activity by adopting and strengthening sustainable development practices.

In 2007, the company became the first cork supplier in the world to receive FSC® (Forest Stewardship Council™) certification from the Rainforest Alliance for its natural cork closures. These prestigious certifications are your guarantee that corks grown and manufactured under this accreditation meet the highest standards of sustainable, socially responsible forestry practices. Amorim and its subsidiaries are an integral part of a conservationist effort to guarantee the survival of hundreds of thousands of cork trees throughout the Mediterranean Basin, a natural and renewable resource that plays a key role in CO2 retention, in preserving biodiversity and in combating desertification.


Inseparable by nature
20 June, 2014

The cork stopper has unique innate qualities, which interact beneficially with wine. It contributes to developing its character, gives it authenticity and brings it value. Cork, which is just as natural and noble as wine, benefits from the production of wine and reciprocates with premium performance stoppers. Both industries have grown together over the centuries.

When Dom Pierre Pérignon decided to swap the wooden stoppers in use in the mid-17th century for cork stoppers, he caused an unprecedented change of events in the wine industry. The French monk, who would become famous for his champagne, sought an alternative to the stoppers used at the time, which were wrapped in hemp soaked in olive oil, failed to provide an effective seal, played a dubious role in the preservation of wine and were always popping out. The solution was cork.

Thousand of years before, the Egyptians had already used cork, followed by the Greeks and Romans, as amphorae discovered in Pompeii bear witness. It was, however, the driving force of Dom Pérignon that paved the way for the use of cork associated with the fast growth of the wine industry. In Portugal, during the following century, where today the centre of the cork and Port Wine industries is found, wine was allowed to age in glass cylindrical bottles for the first time. Thus, it was the simultaneous development of cork stoppers and wine bottles which made the modern wine industry possible.

A SOPHISTICATED NATURAL VALVE

It is believed that just as sparkling wines favour the use of cork, it also played a decisive role in affirming this famous wine. Its natural characteristics - light, easy to compress, impermeable, resistant to moisture and rot, and its resilience - make it an inimitable stopper. It protects wine from variations in temperature and prevents it from deteriorating over time. The discovery of a collection of 168 bottles of champagne in perfect condition, shipwrecked in the Baltic Sea around two hundred years ago, bears witness to the cork stopper's unique ability to preserve wines and champagnes all over the world.

Research carried out by the University of Bordeaux suggests that cork contributes in a unique way to the development of wine. The secret is a complex structure, which technology is yet to replicate. Each cork stopper is a sophisticated natural valve, made up of around 800 million tiny cells of suberin (almost 40 million cells per cubic centimetre), filled with an air-like gas.

When compressed, they behave like a cushion and constantly try to return to their original shape and size, thus adapting to the bottleneck and maintaining a tight seal. It is the air cells that allow a tiny amount of oxygen to permeate the bottle after it has been sealed, which has a beneficial impact on the development of the wine.

«I am certain that cork is the perfect option to seal a bottle of wine. It is a noble and reliable gift from nature.»


ALFONSO LARRAIN
PRESIDENT, CONCHA Y TORO, CHILE

PREMIUM AND ASPIRATIONAL FACTOR

The world's finest wines have always used cork stoppers. Even in the case of champagnes, prestigious wine producers such as Ruinart de Reims and Moët et Chandon, have used them since the 18th century. Currently, producers such as Amorim apply their know-how to the development of new and better solutions which allow the use of a premium product to be broadened to fast consumption wines and spirits, creating products geared towards specific segments. For example, the most expensive whisky in the world, the Dalmore Trinitas 64, and the oldest, the Mortlach 70 years old, by Gordon & MacPhail, are sealed with Amorim cork stoppers.

After a period where some losses in the market share for cork stoppers were seen, the increase in global wine consumption and the confidence of oenologists and consumers have contributed to further growth, particularly in the USA and in some emerging markets such as China, Russia and other non-cork producing countries. Among the reasons which motivate the choice of the cork stopper is the growing perception of the premium and aspirational factors - it is associated with good or excellent quality wines.

Several surveys and market research show that both consumers and wine producers increasingly elect cork also because it is a natural and environment friendly product. They value its traditional association with wine and the fact that it enables it to develop in all its splendour.


AMORIM OPENS NEW SALES AND DISTRIBUTION CENTER IN NAPA
31 January, 2013

NAPA, Calif., January 29, 2013 — Amorim Cork America, the U.S. sales and distribution arm of the world’s largest wine stopper producer, announced today the opening, on February 1, of its new North American sales and distribution center located in the heart of the Napa Valley.

Amorim Cork America’s General Manager, Pedro Fernandes, says the 3.3-acre, 50,000 square foot facility is the newest and most modern facility of its kind in the world. “Building this facility is part of a strategic investment in the future of both the US wine industry and the natural cork industry,” states Fernandes. “We have been working with Cushman & Wakefield Realtors for some time to find the perfect site to best serve our clients – and we found it! The decision to expand was based, in part, on our double digit growth over the past few years and, most certainly, due to the robust preference for natural cork as the closure of choice for the majority of American winemakers and millions of US consumers.”

In keeping with the company’s strong corporate-wide sustainability philosophy, Amorim’s new facility incorporates energy-efficient technology wherever possible. This includes the integration of vast amounts of natural lighting, the use of sustainable construction materials with enhanced building temperature-control features, wastepaper and packaging recycling, the use of recycled irrigation water for landscaping, and even a small planting of natural cork trees for education and beauty. In addition, electric vehicle-charging stations for four vehicles, and a rooftop solar system are being engineered for future use.

About CORTICEIRA AMORIM, SGPS, S.A.

While tracing its roots to the XIX Century, CORTICEIRA AMORIM SGPS has become the world’s largest cork company in the world, generating EUR 495 (666 USD) million in sales throughout 103 countries. CORTICEIRA AMORIM SGPS and its subsidiaries are an integral part of a conservationist effort to guarantee the survival of millions of cork trees throughout the Mediterranean Basin. We are proud of our contribution to the proper use of this important natural forest, which plays a fundamental role in CO2 fixing, preservation of biodiversity and the fight against desertification. We encourage you to learn more by visiting informative websites such as www.corkfacts.com. For additional information about Amorim Cork America, please visit www.amorimca.com. Amorim’s new distribution center is located at 360 Devlin Rd., Napa, CA 94558. 707-224-6000.

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Cork supplier chooses premium highway spot
30 October, 2012

 




It’s hard to miss the large industrial building that seemingly popped up overnight along the west side of Highway 29 near the county airport exit. Located on a prominent spot on Devlin Road in the Napa Valley Gateway Business Park, the structure will become the new home for Amorim Cork America.

According to its website, Amorim, which has been operating from a smaller nearby facility, is among the world’s biggest producers of cork products, with operations in dozens of countries including its home country of Portugal.

A company news release reported that Amorim sold 3 billion wine stoppers in 2010. In the United States, Amorim registered a 22 percent growth in sales volume and a 20 percent increase in sales revenue, the release said.

In November 2011, the company bought the 3-acre parcel from owners Joseph and Deborah Lopez for $1.32 million, according to county recorder documents.

The project should be completed by the end of the year, said Amorim General Manager Pedro Fernandes. “This investment is in line with our strategy to better serve our customers and address expected growth in the near future,” he said.

While Fernandes would not discuss the cost for the project, he called it “substantial.” The general manager said the company chose a site with highway frontage with the goal of “increasing the visibility and making a more prominent image for our company.”

The company’s U.S. base has been located on Napa Valley Corporate Drive for approximately 15 years, occupying 23,000 square feet, with 25 employees, Fernandes said. He didn’t elaborate on hiring plans.

Chris Neeb and colleagues at Cushman & Wakefield represented Amorim in the purchase. The high-exposure location was a requirement for the company, Neeb said.

“From day one they conveyed to us they want to be on Highway 29,” Neeb said.

County planning documents report that the project will include 48,133 square feet of floor area for warehousing, distribution and office areas and parking for 65 vehicles.

The building design “engages with the character of the Napa Valley” with a sloped roof, earth-toned color palette and stone accents, said the planning report. A rain garden will be fed by a canopy roof and the property will include a pedestrian path that “gently meanders” near Devlin Road. Two electric vehicle charging stations servicing four vehicles will be installed.

Amorim’s nearest neighbor will be food manufacturer Made in Napa Valley. Across the street is the yet-to-be-developed Montalcino golf resort.

“It’s a beautiful building,” said Gary Van Dam of Strong and Hayden Commercial Real Estate. “That is one of the best industrial sites in Napa County.”

Van Dam speculated that Amorim paid a 20 percent premium for the location that offers exposure to tens of thousands of cars daily. If clients didn’t know the Amorim name before, they will now, he said.

“It’s wonderful” to have businesses growing in the industrial area, Van Dam said. “Hopefully this is the beginning of more industry coming to Napa.”

Sean Trippi, the county planner for the project, noted that commercial building in the south county area has declined. The slowdown of the economy really affected the development rate out there, he said.

“We used to see a fairly steady amount of planning applications,” perhaps five to six per year, Trippi said. “Now we get one to two, if that ... and some (projects) get approved but not necessarily constructed in a time frame you might have seen previously.”

Amorim’s sister company Portocork America is also located in the south Napa business park on Gateway Drive. That firm is growing as well, President Dustin Mowe said. The business has expanded from 40,000 square feet to 60,000 square feet within two buildings, he said.

The two companies do compete with each other, Mowe said, but “there’s enough business for everybody.”

Cushman & Wakefield is also leasing a 107,000-square-foot industrial space at 1560 Airport Boulevard. Owner Metropolitan Van and Storage occupies part of the building, with Delicato Vineyards and others as additional tenants, Neeb said.

Neeb said vacancy rates in the airport industrial area are declining.

“Activity has been pretty strong and consistent over the past year,” he said.

Lease rates range from 65 to 80 cents per square foot, plus taxes, maintenance and insurance, and depending on the tenant improvements.

 

October 28, 2012 10:12 pm  • 

 

 


Amorim becomes patron of WSET
14 May, 2012

Cork producer Amorim has become a patron of the worldwide Wine & Spirit Education Trust and will help fund an expenses-paid study scholarship to Portugal.

The bronze patron agreement will include a trip for two WSET graduates, one based in the UK and one from the WSET's international student base, to learn about the cork industry.

Students will learn about the traditional cork harvest in the Alentejo forests, and will visit Amorim's production units and R&D laboratories in their Porto HQ.

Chief executive of the WSET, Ian Harris, said: "The WSET welcomes Amorim into our wide-ranging portfolio of patrons. We aim to give our students the opportunity to learn about every aspect of the wine trade – and closures are no exception. These scholarships will offer a valuable insight into the natural cork industry."

Carlos de Jesus, Amorim's head of marketing & communication, said:  "This will be a unique opportunity for two holders of the WSET Level 3 qualification to learn first hand about cork stoppers, and the unrivalled performance and environmental benefits offered by this 100% sustainable, natural material."

"We are delighted to be supporting the excellent educational work that the WSET carries out at all levels and we appreciate the importance of encouraging the next generation of the international wine trade."

The winners of the first Amorim scholarships will be selected in November, during the WSET's Viva Voce day, and announced at the WSET Awards & Graduation Ceremony on January 21, 2013.


Amorim and MCC Association showcase of best bubblies set for 2012
01 May, 2012

The 11th Amorim Cork Méthode Cap Classique Challenge, South Africa's leading competition for MCC wines, is to be held in an auspicious year for Amorim as 2012 celebrates this Portuguese cork company's 30th anniversary of doing business in the country.
 
This year’s competition will be organized by Amorim and the MCC Association, which represents most of the producers of this growing wine category.

“The annual MCC Challenge has been an annual highlight of our marketing activities and has allowed Amorim to become part of a tremendously exciting category in the South African wine industry,” says Joaquim Sa, managing director of Amorim South Africa.

“Since our initial involvement 11 years ago, Amorim and the MCC Association have seen the quality of Cap Classique wines evolve at a tremendous rate. The quality improves each year and the passion shown by the producers has created a category of which the South African consumer just cannot seem to get enough. This is a true South African success story, one of which the rest of the world is aware.”

According to Pieter Ferreira, chairperson of the MCC Association, the Amorim MCC Challenge plays a major role in promoting Cap Classique. “It encourages producers to aim higher, something they now have to do seeing that the general quality of MCC is improving in leaps and bounds,” says Ferreira. “But the competition also generates a fizz among the public – everyone just loves a winner, this is a fact. And each year’s winning producers all admit to an increase in the demand for their products once the winners have been announced.” 

This year’s judging will be held on 28 August, with the winners being announced on 20 September. Members of the MCC Association and other producers will be notified once entries open. 

The competition rewards top-performing wines in four categories, namely Non-Vintage, Vintage, Blanc de Blancs and Rosé. 2012 will see the introduction of a Museum Class for wines of seven years and older.

AMORIM ACHIEVES WINE CORK SALES RECORD
01 March, 2011

Media Release: 25 February 2011
AMORIM ACHIEVES WINE CORK SALES RECORD
Amorim, the world’s leading cork producer, has announced record annual
sales, with more than 3 billion wine stoppers sold in 2010.
The outstanding sales volume figure was included in the company’s 2010
financial results released recently.
Amorim’s Cork Stoppers Business Unit — the company’s core business —
posted a sales volume increase of 13.8 per cent, further consolidating its
position as the world’s largest supplier of wine stoppers.
Amorim recorded significant sales volume and sales revenue growth in all of
its major ‘Old World’ wine markets, with France, Italy and Spain breaking
historical sales volumes with growth rates ranging from 10 to 29 per cent.
Double-digit sales revenue growth was also recorded in prominent ‘New
World’ wine markets such as Argentina and Australia, with the latter posting a
significant 17.4 per cent increase in sales revenue. In Chile, Amorim’s growth
reached 9.1 per cent.
In the United States, Amorim registered a 22 per cent growth in sales volume
and a 20 per cent increase in sales revenue, posting yet another sales record
in this key market.
A return to natural cork closures by major retailers in the United Kingdom saw
unit sales in this market increase by almost 50 per cent in 2010.
Sales of all types of stoppers were higher worldwide including whole natural
cork closures, champagne stoppers and technical corks.
“Passing the 3 billion barrier is an exceptional result — particularly when you
consider that in 2010 we were emerging from the global financial crisis,” said
Amorim’s chairman and CEO, António Amorim.
“Along with the outstanding sales result, we witnessed strong consumer
preference for cork in the US, an increase in the use of cork by the ‘Top 100’
US wine brands and a return to cork by major supermarkets in the UK.
“There was also recognition in the wine and spirits industries that Amorim is
the company to talk to for key projects, particularly when it comes to sealing
the world’s most precious beverages.”
Mr Amorim said that natural cork was enjoying a renaissance in many sectors
— including building, design and fashion — due to a growing understanding of
the added value that natural cork brings to a product.
“This is also evident in the drinks sector with increasing awareness of cork’s
environmental advantages and acknowledgement of the added value of a
quality natural cork closure.
“In the wine industry, we have seen a number of wineries return to cork in the
past 12 months based on significant improvements in cork’s performance,
consumer preference, sustainability and concerns over issues with alternative
closures.”
The annual worldwide market for wine stoppers is estimated at 17 billion with
the cork industry producing approximately 12 billion stoppers, giving it 70 per
cent of the total global wine closure market.
Amorim’s 2010 sales result means it now accounts for about 26 per cent of
total cork stopper sales for the year and has greater sales volume than any of
the types of alternative wine closures currently in the market place.
* * *
For additional information:
Carlos de Jesus, Amorim, Portugal
Phone: + 351 22 747 5519
E-mail: carlos.dejesus.ai@amorim.com
ABOUT CORTICEIRA AMORIM, SGPS, S.A.
Tracing its roots to the 19th century, Corticeira Amorim has become the largest cork and
cork-derived company in the world, generating over Euro 450 million in sales throughout more
than 100 countries. Corticeira Amorim and its subsidiaries are an integral part of a
conservation effort to guarantee the survival of hundreds of thousands of cork oak trees
throughout the Mediterranean Basin. We are proud of our contribution to the correct utilisation
of these important forests that represent a key role in CO2 retention, preserving biodiversity
and preventing desertification. We encourage you to learn more by visiting informative
websites such as www.corkfacts.com or www.realcork.org or www.corticeiraamorim.coAMORIM ACHIEVES WINE CORK SALES RECORD

Amorim, the world’s leading cork producer, has announced record annual sales, with more than 3 billion wine stoppers sold in 2010.

The outstanding sales volume figure was included in the company’s 2010 financial results released recently.

Amorim’s Cork Stoppers Business Unit — the company’s core business — posted a sales volume increase of 13.8 per cent, further consolidating its position as the world’s largest supplier of wine stoppers.

Amorim recorded significant sales volume and sales revenue growth in all of its major ‘Old World’ wine markets, with France, Italy and Spain breaking historical sales volumes with growth rates ranging from 10 to 29 per cent.

Double-digit sales revenue growth was also recorded in prominent ‘New World’ wine markets such as Argentina and Australia, with the latter posting a significant 17.4 per cent increase in sales revenue. In Chile, Amorim’s growth reached 9.1 per cent.

In the United States, Amorim registered a 22 per cent growth in sales volume and a 20 per cent increase in sales revenue, posting yet another sales record in this key market.

A return to natural cork closures by major retailers in the United Kingdom saw unit sales in this market increase by almost 50 per cent in 2010.

Sales of all types of stoppers were higher worldwide including whole natural cork closures, champagne stoppers and technical corks.

“Passing the 3 billion barrier is an exceptional result — particularly when you consider that in 2010 we were emerging from the global financial crisis,” said Amorim’s chairman and CEO, António Amorim.

“Along with the outstanding sales result, we witnessed strong consumer preference for cork in the US, an increase in the use of cork by the ‘Top 100’ US wine brands and a return to cork by major supermarkets in the UK.

“There was also recognition in the wine and spirits industries that Amorim is the company to talk to for key projects, particularly when it comes to sealing the world’s most precious beverages.”

Mr Amorim said that natural cork was enjoying a renaissance in many sectors — including building, design and fashion — due to a growing understanding of the added value that natural cork brings to a product.

“This is also evident in the drinks sector with increasing awareness of cork’s environmental advantages and acknowledgement of the added value of a quality natural cork closure.

“In the wine industry, we have seen a number of wineries return to cork in the past 12 months based on significant improvements in cork’s performance, consumer preference, sustainability and concerns over issues with alternative closures.”

The annual worldwide market for wine stoppers is estimated at 17 billion with the cork industry producing approximately 12 billion stoppers, giving it 70 per cent of the total global wine closure market.

Amorim’s 2010 sales result means it now accounts for about 26 per cent of total cork stopper sales for the year and has greater sales volume than any of the types of alternative wine closures currently in the market place.

* * *

For additional information:

Carlos de Jesus, Amorim, Portugal

Phone: + 351 22 747 5519

E-mail: carlos.dejesus.ai@amorim.com

ABOUT CORTICEIRA AMORIM, SGPS, S.A.

Tracing its roots to the 19th century, Corticeira Amorim has become the largest cork and

cork-derived company in the world, generating over Euro 450 million in sales throughout more

than 100 countries. Corticeira Amorim and its subsidiaries are an integral part of a

conservation effort to guarantee the survival of hundreds of thousands of cork oak trees

throughout the Mediterranean Basin. We are proud of our contribution to the correct utilisation

of these important forests that represent a key role in CO2 retention, preserving biodiversity

and preventing desertification. We encourage you to learn more by visiting informative

websites such as www.corkfacts.com or www.realcork.org or www.corticeiraamorim.com